COURSE SCHEDULE

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Course Listing for AMERICAN STUDIES - Fall 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2046 AMST-203-01 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Paulin,Diana R. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for sophomores, 7 for first year students, 2 for juniors.
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
2330 AMST-203-02 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Gieseking,Jack MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for sophomores, 7 for first year students, 2 for juniors
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
  View syllabus
3471 AMST-285-01 Born in Blood 1.00 LEC Gac,Scott MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 49 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with HIST
  NOTE: 17 seats reserved for first year students, 17 for sophomores, 10 for juniors, and 5 for seniors
  This course explains how violence has made modern America and belongs alongside liberty, democracy, freedom, and equality in the pantheon of American political and cultural ideals. Using figures such as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Dwight Eisenhower, and events from the American Revolution to the era of Civil Rights, "Born in Blood" situates state sanctioned violence against American citizens as a definitive force in American life.
3472 AMST-325-01 New York and its Neighborhoods 1.00 SEM Manevitz,Alexander D. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with HIST, URST
  Founded as a small Dutch colonial port city on a narrow island inhabited by Lenape Indians, New York City became the most populous city in the United States, as well as a global economic and cultural hub. In order to better understand New York’s complex and uneven urban growth, we will analyze the ways a diverse array of New Yorkers struggled to define themselves and their communities. As we explore the dynamic history of the city and its residents, we will become better scholars and more responsible urban citizens. Each class meeting will focus on one of New York City’s diverse neighborhoods, using it as a lens to illustrate and investigate important themes of urban and American history that extend well beyond the five boroughs.
  View syllabus
3573 AMST-354-01 US Civil War/Reconstruction 1.00 SEM Manevitz,Alexander D. M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with HIST
  As much as the American Civil War was a culmination of centuries of history, it was also a moment of fundamental rupture, transformation, and opportunity. The war, reconstruction, and their reverberations shook the whole nation. At the center of this tumultuous time was the destruction of slavery-on which the nation had been built-and the reconstruction of freedom, labor, and capital across the country. This course will highlight the social, political, economic, and cultural forces that shaped the epoch and changed the nation. Some of the issues we will investigate include: the causes and effects of the American Civil War, slavery, emancipation and freedom, race, racism and racial violence, gender and the role of women in the war and its aftermath, and historical memory.
  View syllabus
2138 AMST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
3344 AMST-402-01 Senior Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Students undertake projects on American studies topics of their own choosing. The projects will be supervised by a faculty member in an American studies-related field. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the project adviser and director, are required for enrollment.
3473 AMST-409-01 American Empire 1.00 SEM Baldwin,Davarian L. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with INTS Cross-listing: AMST-809-01
  Thomas Jefferson once boldly described the United States as an “empire of liberty.” But whether or not America has ever taken on the identity, ever functioned, as an empire has been one of the most hotly debated topics of our current global times. In this senior seminar we want to take both a historical and contemporary look at what happens when the foreign policy of the United States converges with the general practices of military engagement, occupation, nation-building, commercial market control, and/or annexation of “foreign lands.” Do such foreign relations constitute an empire? In this course we will examine a number of critical moments including the internal U.S. expansion into native American and Mexican lands, “Manifest Destiny” projects in the turn-of-the-twentieth century Caribbean and Asian Pacific, Marshall Plan policies in Cold War Europe, and “War on Terror” initiatives in the present day Middle East. What have been the aspirations of U.S. foreign policy, what have been the consequences, how do they affect the policies and practices “back home.” Have any of these experiences constituted an American Empire?
3123 AMST-409-02 Digital City 1.00 SEM Gieseking,Jack M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with ANTH, CLIC, URST Cross-listing: AMST-809-02
  With half the world's population now in cities, policymakers and activists are focused on the promise of technology to tackle issues from gentrification, pollution, access to public spaces, and walkability. How can digital platforms affect the growth of equal and just cities? How can critical interventions using such platforms work to recognize differences of gender, race, sexuality, and class in cities, and promote equality? What role do and should colleges play in supporting the growth of just and equal spaces? Focusing on Hartford and Trinity, this course connects global and national issues to the intimate experiences of everyday urban life. It pairs technical skills and social science data collection with urban theory and urban studies. Students contribute to an online archive examining the college-city relationship.
  View syllabus
3655 AMST-424-01 American Comics 1.00 SEM Couch,N. C. Christopher T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-824-01
  This course provides an introduction to Comic Art in North America, from the beginnings of the newspaper comic strip through the development of comic books, the growth of graphic novels, and current developments in electronic media. It focuses on the history and aesthetics of the medium, comparison between developments in the United States, Mexico, and French Canada, and the social and cultural contexts in which comic art is created and consumed. The first half of the semester concentrates on early and 20th-century comic strips and the development of the comic book form through the 1940s; the second on the social changes affecting comic art in the 1950s and 1960s, the development of a comic book subculture from the 1970s to the 21st century, the growth of independently published graphic novels and the independent comics, and contemporary electronic media developments.
3664 AMST-426-01 Nuclear America 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-826-01
  In this course we will explore large- and small-scale cultural landscapes as they have been shaped by nuclear power, weapons, transportation, and waste. Among these landscapes are towns created for making nuclear weapons; open-air testing sites; military complexes, such as ports, bases, airfields, and silos; the West’s uranium mines, and the land, water, and Native American territory polluted by radioactive tailings; nuclear reactor sites, from New England’s regional power plants to those in metropolitan areas; and land and offshore storage sites for nuclear waste. Besides the physical changes to the American landscape, nuclear sites involve extensive secrecy, exclusion, and policing, and they are invested with fraught meanings. We will explore nuclear America through history, geography, art, literature, and film.
2761 AMST-435-01 Museum Exhibition 1.00 SEM Ring,Richard J. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-835-01
  One of the most engaging ways to promote collections and explore a subject or theme is to create an exhibition, which is a genre in and of itself—telling a story with artifacts. Through critical readings students will explore the cultural and educational goals of exhibits, visitor needs and accessibility, design elements (including technology), and audience evaluation methods utilized at libraries, historic houses and historical sites, and history and cultural museums. Drawing from the extensive and wide-ranging collections in the Watkinson Library, students will conceive, write, and install an exhibition, design and publish a catalogue, and plan and implement an opening event to take place at the end of the semester in the Watkinson.
  View syllabus
2187 AMST-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
2298 AMST-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
2139 AMST-498-01 Senior Thesis Part 1 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE:
  NOTE: Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director are required for enrollment. The registration form is required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director are required for enrollment. The registration form is required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2687 AMST-801-01 Approaches to American Studies 1.00 LEC Miller,Karen Li R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This seminar, which is required of all American studies graduate students, examines a variety of approaches to the field. Readings may include several “classic” texts of 18th- and 19th-century American culture and several key works of American studies scholarship from the formative period of the field after World War II, as well as more recent contributions to the study of the United States. Topics will include changing ideas about the content, production, and consumption of American culture; patterns of ethnic identification and definition; the construction of categories like “race” and “gender”; and the bearing of class, race, gender, and sexuality on individuals’ participation in American society and culture. Undergraduates who wish to enroll in this course must obtain permission of their adviser and the instructor.
3653 AMST-809-01 American Empire 1.00 SEM Baldwin,Davarian L. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-409-01
  Thomas Jefferson once boldly described the United States as an “empire of liberty.” But whether or not America has ever taken on the identity, ever functioned, as an empire has been one of the most hotly debated topics of our current global times. In this senior seminar we want to take both a historical and contemporary look at what happens when the foreign policy of the United States converges with the general practices of military engagement, occupation, nation-building, commercial market control, and/or annexation of “foreign lands.” Do such foreign relations constitute an empire? In this course we will examine a number of critical moments including the internal U.S. expansion into native American and Mexican lands, “Manifest Destiny” projects in the turn-of-the-twentieth century Caribbean and Asian Pacific, Marshall Plan policies in Cold War Europe, and “War on Terror” initiatives in the present day Middle East. What have been the aspirations of U.S. foreign policy, what have been the consequences, how do they affect the policies and practices “back home.” Have any of these experiences constituted an American Empire?
3214 AMST-809-02 Digital City 1.00 SEM Gieseking,Jack M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-409-02
  With half the world's population now in cities, policymakers and activists are focused on the promise of technology to tackle issues from gentrification, pollution, access to public spaces, and walkability. How can digital platforms affect the growth of equal and just cities? How can critical interventions using such platforms work to recognize differences of gender, race, sexuality, and class in cities, and promote equality? What role do and should colleges play in supporting the growth of just and equal spaces? Focusing on Hartford and Trinity, this course connects global and national issues to the intimate experiences of everyday urban life. It pairs technical skills and social science data collection with urban theory and urban studies. Students contribute to an online archive examining the college-city relationship.
3654 AMST-824-01 American Comics 1.00 SEM Couch,N. C. Christopher T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-424-01
  This course provides an introduction to Comic Art in North America, from the beginnings of the newspaper comic strip through the development of comic books, the growth of graphic novels, and current developments in electronic media. It focuses on the history and aesthetics of the medium, comparison between developments in the United States, Mexico, and French Canada, and the social and cultural contexts in which comic art is created and consumed. The first half of the semester concentrates on early and 20th-century comic strips and the development of the comic book form through the 1940s; the second on the social changes affecting comic art in the 1950s and 1960s, the development of a comic book subculture from the 1970s to the 21st century, the growth of independently published graphic novels and the independent comics, and contemporary electronic media developments.
3639 AMST-826-01 Nuclear America 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn M: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-426-01
  In this course we will explore large- and small-scale cultural landscapes as they have been shaped by nuclear power, weapons, transportation, and waste. Among these landscapes are towns created for making nuclear weapons; open-air testing sites; military complexes, such as ports, bases, airfields, and silos; the West’s uranium mines, and the land, water, and Native American territory polluted by radioactive tailings; nuclear reactor sites, from New England’s regional power plants to those in metropolitan areas; and land and offshore storage sites for nuclear waste. Besides the physical changes to the American landscape, nuclear sites involve extensive secrecy, exclusion, and policing, and they are invested with fraught meanings. We will explore nuclear America through history, geography, art, literature, and film.
2705 AMST-835-01 Museum Exhibition 1.00 SEM Ring,Richard J. W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-435-01
  One of the most engaging ways to promote collections and explore a subject or theme is to create an exhibition, which is a genre in and of itself—telling a story with artifacts. Through critical readings students will explore the cultural and educational goals of exhibits, visitor needs and accessibility, design elements (including technology), and audience evaluation methods utilized at libraries, historic houses and historical sites, and history and cultural museums. Drawing from the extensive and wide-ranging collections in the Watkinson Library, students will conceive, write, and install an exhibition, design and publish a catalogue, and plan and implement an opening event to take place at the end of the semester in the Watkinson.
  View syllabus
3652 AMST-853-01 American Slavery 1.00 SEM Gac,Scott M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: HIST-353-01
  This course covers important themes and developments in the history of slavery in the United States. From origins in indigenous communities, colonization, and the black Atlantic, human bondage shaped (and continues to shape) the legal and social framework for generations of Americans. Readings feature voices from slaveholders to the enslaved, politicians and activists, as well as some of the best work done by recent historians.
2345 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
2174 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2170 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
2171 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2173 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
2172 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
3083 ENGL-104-01 Intro Amer Literature-I 1.00 LEC Hager,Christopher TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  NOTE: 15 spaces are reserved for first-year students, 2 seats for HMTCA students.
  This course introduces students to American literature before 1865 by surveying a wide range of texts-some very famous, some little-known-written by and about people living in the present-day United States, from the earliest Europeans' arrival in the Americas until the time of the U.S. Civil War. The course will trace political, intellectual, and social developments as they interacted with literary culture. Students will both acquire knowledge of American cultural history and develop skills of literary analysis. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  View syllabus
3436 ENGL-305-01 Evolution of the Western Film 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM
W: 6:30PM-9:30PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, FILM
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. This course is research intensive.
  NOTE: Evening meeting time is for screenings only.
  The course examines how the Western genre emerged from global popular culture at the end of the 19th century to become one of the most powerful and complex forms for expressing the experience of Modernity. After careful consideration of the political and philosophical implications of the Western, we will track the development of the genre as it responds to the ideological contradictions and cultural tensions of 20th-century American history, focusing on broad trends within the mainstream, the contributions of individual directors, and the global dissemination of generic elements. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. Evening meeting time is for screenings only. This course is research intensive.
3660 ENGL-307-01 Early American Women's Lit 1.00 SEM Wyss,Hilary E. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, WMGS
  NOTE: This is a research-intensive seminar. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
  Although early American literature often revolves around "Founding Fathers," in this course we will examine the writing of women. Writing poetry, journals, novels, travel diaries and letters, colonial women had a lot to say about their world and were extraordinarily creative in finding ways to say it-even when the society they lived in suggested it was "improper" for them to write. Along with elite white women, Native Americans, free African Americans, slaves, and indentured servants all wrote as well. As we explore this writing, we will think about what the texts these women produced tell us about the early American experience-how people thought of their place in the world, and what role women imagined for themselves in this newly developing society. This is a research-intensive seminar. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
3414 ENGL-355-01 Narratives of Disability 1.00 SEM Paulin,Diana R. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. This course is research-intensive.
  This course introduces students to the ways in which disability has been used to represent both "normalcy" and extraordinariness in literature. We will consider how "tales told by idiots," as framed in Shakespeare's Hamlet, often supply the unique and insightful perspective that mainstream characters cannot see, hear, or experience because of their own limitations. We will look at how the notion of disability has been aligned with other aspects of identity, such as Charles Chesnutt's representation of race as a disability in his turn of the century literature or of slaves using performances of disability to escape from the horrid institution during the 19th-century. We will read a variety of genres, fiction, memoir, and some literary criticism to come to a clearer understanding of the ways in which the meaning of disability and its representation in a variety of texts echoes a broader set of beliefs and practices in the U.S. For English majors this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written after 1900. This course is research-intensive.
3552 ENGL-377-01 The Revolutionary Generations 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research-intensive.
  Hannah Arendt suggested that the United States failed to remember its revolutionary tradition because it failed to talk about it. This course will recover those memories by reading the texts that founded the American rebellion, the writings produced in the aftermath of independence, and the creative works crafted in the wake of revolution. Our focus will be on the literature from 1740 until 1820 that struggled to define ways of being in the world that seemed specifically American; therefore, we will look beyond the context of New England to consider the roles played by Africa and the Caribbean in the cultural imagination, and we will trace how social class, race, and gender inflected the output of American writers in a post-1776 world. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.This course is research-intensive.
3646 ENGL-474-01 Race & Realism: African-Am Lit 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST Cross-listing: ENGL-874-01
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written post-1900.
  Coming of age in the ruins of Reconstruction, the encroachment of Jim Crow laws, and waves of great migration, African American writers of the early 20th century shaped American literature in powerful and often-forgotten ways. Their texts, published in the decades before the Harlem Renaissance, offer an opportunity to consider how people produce literature under the pressures of structural racism; how art might respond to the terrorism of state sanctioned violence; how genres might stretch to articulate the psychological complexities of social and self identities; and how writers appeal to audiences, construct communities, forge friendships, and speak truth to power, despite institutional ambivalence and resistance to their voices. Course readings will come from Charles Chesnutt, Pauline Hopkins, Alice Dunbar Nelson, WEB Du Bois and others. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written post-1900.
3647 ENGL-874-01 Race & Realism: African-Am Lit 1.00 SEM Mrozowski,Daniel J. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST Cross-listing: ENGL-474-01
  Coming of age in the ruins of Reconstruction, the encroachment of Jim Crow laws, and waves of great migration, African American writers of the early 20th century shaped American literature in powerful and often-forgotten ways. Their texts, published in the decades before the Harlem Renaissance, offer an opportunity to consider how people produce literature under the pressures of structural racism; how art might respond to the terrorism of state sanctioned violence; how genres might stretch to articulate the psychological complexities of social and self identities; and how writers appeal to audiences, construct communities, forge friendships, and speak truth to power, despite institutional ambivalence and resistance to their voices. Course readings will come from Charles Chesnutt, Pauline Hopkins, Alice Dunbar Nelson, WEB Du Bois and others. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written post-1900.
3555 HIST-200-01 Hartford: Past and Present 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AMST Cross-listing: URST-200-01
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  Since Dutch fur traders arrived in the 1610s, Hartford and its region have been part of many core themes in American urban history. This course examines Hartford's rise as a financial and manufacturing center from the 1800s to early 1900s; the roles played by ethnicity, gender, religion, race and social class in urban and suburban politics, culture, civic institutions and neighborhoods; the evolution in urban planning, architecture, transportation and public spaces; and the impact of post-¬-1945 suburbanization, capitalist restructuring and globalization on the social, political and cultural profile of Hartford and its suburbs.
3557 HIST-209-01 African-American History 1.00 LEC Greenberg,Cheryl TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  The experiences of African-Americans from the 17th century to the present with particular emphasis on life in slavery and in the 20th-century urban North.
  View syllabus
3105 HIST-311-01 Place in the Native Northeast 1.00 SEM Wickman,Thomas M. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  NOTE: Class enrollment is limited to 10 History majors and 5 American Studies majors.
  The coasts, rivers, fields, hills, villages, and cities of present-day Rhode Island, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia have been home for indigenous families, communities, and nations through numerous environmental, political, and economic transformations. Students will learn about the ways that Native nations of the Northeast, from Pequots to Mi'kmaqs, have adapted, recreated, and reaffirmed a deep connectedness to their homelands and territories, from the fifteenth century to the present. Fields trips to local sites and archives will facilitate original historical research. Primary sources to be assigned include autobiographies, travel narratives, war histories, maps, Native American stories, and dictionaries of indigenous place names, and secondary source readings will cover major themes in Native American studies, with special emphasis on sense of place.
3595 HIST-353-01 American Slavery 1.00 SEM Gac,Scott M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST Cross-listing: AMST-853-01
  This course covers important themes and developments in the history of slavery in the United States. From origins in indigenous communities, colonization, and the black Atlantic, human bondage shaped (and continues to shape) the legal and social framework for generations of Americans. Readings feature voices from slaveholders to the enslaved, politicians and activists, as well as some of the best work done by recent historians.
3446 MUSC-272-01 Contemporary Musical Theater 1.00 LEC Moshell,Gerald TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 40 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  An appreciation of the corpus of Broadway musicals that, beginning with 1968's Hair, brought new aesthetic and intellectual vigor to an art form grown stale on the outmoded formulas of Rodgers & Hammerstein and Lerner & Loewe. "Musical comedy" no longer constitutes an appropriate term for these works born of contemporary consciousness and realism, works influenced by some of the most advanced streams of 20th-century artistic thought. Works to be studied include Hair, Pippin, Sweeney Todd, A Chorus Line, Cats, Spring Awakening, The Book of Mormon, Hamilton, and many others. No previous training in music is required.
2101 PBPL-201-01 Intro to Ameri Public Policy 1.00 LEC Moskowitz,Rachel L MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  NOTE: Course not open to First Year Students
  NOTE: 25 seats reserved for sophomores and 5 seats reserved for juniors.
  This course introduces students to the formal and informal processes through which American public policy is made. They will study the constitutional institutions of government and the distinct role each branch of the national government plays in the policy-making process, and also examine the ways in which informal institutions-political parties, the media, and political lobbyists-contribute to and shape the policy process.
3593 PBPL-352-01 Art and the Public Good 1.00 SEM Power,Katharine G. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  Is art a public good? Is government good for art? Students will explore these questions by examining what happens when U.S. taxpayer dollars are used to fund the arts. Course topics will include: the depression era federal arts projects and the dream of a "cultural democracy" that inspired them; the State Department's export of art across the globe during the Cold War era; the legal and congressional battles over offensive art that threatened to shut down the National Endowment for the Arts during the 1990s; and former Mayor Giuliani's attempt to withdraw funding from the Brooklyn Museum of Art following public outcry over a provocative depiction of the Virgin Mary.
3479 PHIL-239-01 African-American Feminism 1.00 SEM Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST Cross-listing: WMGS-239-01
  This course is a historical survey of the writings of African-American women as they have historically attempted to negotiate fundamental philosophical questions of the "race problem" and the "woman problem." To this extent, we will be inserting black women's voices into the philosophical canon of both race and feminism. Along with exploring and contextualizing the responses and dialogues of women writers, like Anna Julia Cooper with their more famous male contemporaries such as Du Bois, up to more contemporary articulations of black women's voices in what is known as hip-hop feminism, we will ask the question of whether there is a particular black feminist thought, epistemology, and thus philosophy.
3506 POLS-102-01 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Chambers,Stefanie TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This section is methodologically focused
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 15 seats for sophomores, and 5 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
3507 POLS-102-02 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Chambers,Stefanie TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This section is methodologically focused
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 15 seats for sophomores, and 5 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
2334 POLS-301-01 American Political Parties 1.00 LEC Evans,Diana TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, PBPL
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Political Science 102.
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused.
  An analysis of American political parties, including a study of voting behavior, party organization and leadership, and recent and proposed reforms and proposals for reorganization of existing party structures.
3512 POLS-307-01 Constitutionl Powr/Civil Rghts 1.00 SEM McMahon,Kevin J. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  NOTE: This course is methodologically focused
  An analysis and evaluation of US Supreme Court decision-making with a focus on judicial review; federalism and the regulation of the economy and morality; equal protection and the evolving concept of democracy; and presidential powers.
3556 URST-200-01 Hartford: Past and Present 1.00 LEC Figueroa,Luis A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AMST Cross-listing: HIST-200-01
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  Since Dutch fur traders arrived in the 1610s, Hartford and its region have been part of many core themes in American urban history. This course examines Hartford's rise as a financial and manufacturing center from the 1800s to early 1900s; the roles played by ethnicity, gender, religion, race and social class in urban and suburban politics, culture, civic institutions and neighborhoods; the evolution in urban planning, architecture, transportation and public spaces; and the impact of post-¬-1945 suburbanization, capitalist restructuring and globalization on the social, political and cultural profile of Hartford and its suburbs.
3665 WMGS-239-01 African-American Feminism 1.00 SEM Cancelled HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST Cross-listing: PHIL-239-01
  This course is a historical survey of the writings of African-American women as they have historically attempted to negotiate fundamental philosophical questions of the "race problem" and the "woman problem." To this extent, we will be inserting black women's voices into the philosophical canon of both race and feminism. Along with exploring and contextualizing the responses and dialogues of women writers, like Anna Julia Cooper with their more famous male contemporaries such as Du Bois, up to more contemporary articulations of black women's voices in what is known as hip-hop feminism, we will ask the question of whether there is a particular black feminist thought, epistemology, and thus philosophy.
3051 WMGS-245-01 The Hollywood Musical 1.00 LEC Corber,Robert J. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, ENGL, FILM
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  Perhaps more than any other genre, the musical epitomized Hollywood’s “golden age.” This course traces the development of the enormously popular genre from its emergence at the beginning of the Great Depression to its decline amid the social upheavals of the 1960s. It pays particular attention to the genre’s queering of masculinity and femininity, as well as its relationship to camp modes of reception. Readings by Jane Feuer, Rick Altman, Richard Dyer, Janet Staiger, and Steven Cohan.
3422 WMGS-301-01 Western Feminist Thought 1.00 LEC Hedrick,Joan D. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, HIST, PBPL
  Prerequisite: C- or better in one other course in Women Gender and Sexuality.
  An exploration of the main currents in American feminism, with occasional excursions into European thought. The course readings assume (rather than demonstrate) women’s historical subordination to man and put forward various explanations and strategies for change. Readings in J.S. Mill, C. P. Gilman, Emma Goldman, Simone de Beauvoir, Adrienne Rich, bell hooks, Mary Daly, Audre Lorde, and others. This course is not open to First-Year students.
3658 WMGS-335-01 Mapping American Masculinities 1.00 SEM Corber,Robert J. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, ENGL, FILM
  This course examines the construction of masculinity in American society starting with Theodore Roosevelt’s call at the turn of the twentieth century for men to revitalize the nation by pursuing the “strenuous life." Through close readings of literary and filmic texts, it considers why American manhood has so often been seen as in crisis. It pays particular attention to the formation of non-normative masculinities (African-American, female, and gay) in relation to entrenched racial, class, and sexual hierarchies, as well as the impact of the feminist, civil rights, and gay liberation movements on the shifting construction of male identity. In addition to critical essays, readings also include Tarzan of the Apes, The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, The Great Gatsby, The Sun also Rises, Native Son, Another Country, and Kiss Me Deadly (Spillane). Film screenings include Kiss Me Deadly (Aldrich), Shaft, Magnum Force, Philadelphia, Brokeback Mountain, Cleopatra Jones, and Boys Don’t Cry.