COURSE SCHEDULE

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Course Listing for FIRST YEAR SEMINAR - Fall 2018
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3571 FYSM-101-01 BFF or Strange Bedfellows? 1.00 SEM Spezialetti,Madalene TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Is the enemy of your enemy your friend, or will you need to make friends with your enemies? Will you use rhetoric, reason, persuasion, or just plain violence to get what you want? Leave your twenty-first century American sensibilities behind as you assume the roles of a member of an Athenian assembly in 403 B.C. and a member of the 1945 conference in Simla, India, to explore the timeless question of how much one should give up to get his or her political way. Using the role playing/game playing teaching paradigm of “Reacting to the Past,” your character’s political successes, failures and compromises will shape the outcome of “history.”
3765 FYSM-105-01 Prohibitions 1.00 SEM Alcorn,John H. MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  This seminar tackles two questions: Why do we outlaw some consensual behaviors by adults? And should we? We will examine “vices” (alcohol, drugs, and gambling), “repugnant markets” (commerce in sex, organs for transplantation, and adoption), and prohibitions against guns, advertising, and open international labor migration. Students will learn fundamentals of social science and will practice constructing perspicuous arguments. To punctuate the course, students will conduct policy debates during Trinity’s Common Hour. This is an experimental First-Year seminar that mixes traditional seminar meetings, public debates, multimedia instruction, and workshops in which students will learn to create polished virtual presentations of their final projects.
3617 FYSM-112-01 The Discovery of the(New)World 1.00 SEM Souto Alcalde,David TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Columbus' expedition to the New World gave rise to a cultural, epistemic, ethical and ecological shock. The result of this encounter between the old and the new world was not the discovery of America but the discovery of the world as a global entity and the emergence of a global reality of human and ecological exploitation. This seminar explores the ambivalent role played in this discovery by literature and science as two new and radical tools that defied tradition through the promotion of personal experience and individualism. The revolution of experience that shaped this world created forms of socialization and politicization of reality that are fundamental to understand our present (i.e., international rights). Readings include New World Chronicles, literature, scientific treatises, visual and musical materials.
3638 FYSM-113-01 Knights, Saints, Witches & You 1.00 SEM Levesque,Elliot MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  At first glance, the questing knight, maleficent witch and holy saint seem to have little in common with each other and with the modern world. But, upon deeper investigation, it is clear that there are connections between the three and the modern west. Although not monumental events like wars or revolutions, these three aspects of medieval society influenced their own time as well as the present. Through an examination of medieval literature focusing on King Arthur, magic, miracles and chivalry, this course aims to explore the life and ideas of the time, as well as offer insights into the modern Western mind.
3567 FYSM-128-01 Slavery, Property, Piracy 1.00 SEM Kamola,Isaac A. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  This course explores the complex relationship between slavery, property, and piracy from the 18th century to the present. We start by reading foundational texts in economic theory, including John Locke and Adam Smith, before situating these thinkers within their historical context-including the enclosure of the commons, the transatlantic slave trade, the Haitian Revolution, and the golden age of piracy in the Caribbean. Then, drawing on contemporary scholarship and archival material in Trinity College's Watkinson Collection, we examine the historical ties between the Connecticut River valley and sugar plantations in the Caribbean. We conclude by examining contemporary examples of slavery and piracy (including human trafficking and Somali piracy) in order to revisit the question: How should we understand the relationship between slavery, property and piracy.
3612 FYSM-129-01 Illness as Narrative 1.00 SEM Chmielewska,Ewa MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This seminar explores the intersections of literary fiction and medicine. From the notion of illness as narrative to the fictional nature of case studies, this course analyses the role of stories and storytelling in medical practice (given, for instance, the importance of medical history in making diagnosis), and, conversely, points at the experience of illness as a factor shaping literary fiction. We will study, among other questions, the undercurrent of the disabled and ill writers and characters from different historical periods and cultures, in many cases female subjects, and explore the representations of an active stand against one´s illness as an empowering strategy of both political and ethical value. Readings will include fiction and non-fiction, critical theory, biopolitics, bioethics and medical texts.
3619 FYSM-133-01 The Anatomy of Forgiveness 1.00 SEM Fixel,Deborah A. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Forgiveness has been regarded as both an art and a science. For centuries, artists have explored it in terms of how we deal with transgressions both in our personal relationships and in society. In the mid-1980s, scientific study of forgiveness became prevalent as psychologists explored various aspects of the subject. Since then, people have been paying more attention to the study of forgiveness in popular culture as well as science. In this seminar we will explore what forgiveness is, how to measure forgiveness, how forgiveness is related to religion (and for whom), how forgiveness affects participants in the process, what the benefits of forgiveness are, and the costs and limits of forgiveness.
3672 FYSM-134-01 Games of Strategy 1.00 SEM Schneider,Arthur M. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  In this seminar we will learn about games and their predictions of rational human behavior. We will run a series of bargaining and social dilemma games to test whether these predictions are indeed true. Our goal will be to study how people actually behave in economic settings, not how we think they should behave. We will address the importance of monetary incentives in experimental economics and determine how to properly incentivize our own experiments. We will discuss the relevance and applicability of our experiments outside of economics. Finally, students will be required to design and conduct their own game experiments. No previous background in economics or game theory is required to take this course.
3639 FYSM-138-01 Public Art 1.00 SEM Gordon,Alden R. F: 1:00PM-4:00PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Art in public places has been a part of civilized societies since ancient times. But in the age of Street Art, graffiti and protests calling for the removal of Confederate monuments, public art has begun to seem dangerous and full of menacing power and political messaging. This seminar will ask its members to examine the contexts in which art has been and is now made and displayed. Students will research, write, photograph, do interviews, record video and catalog works of public art and architecture to learn first-hand how to think critically about the issues involved in public art and civic engagement. The course will involve field trips and strenuous walking and endurance.
3615 FYSM-142-01 Medicine & Health Ancient Rome 1.00 SEM Caldwell,Lauren E. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  In this seminar, we'll investigate the world of health and healing in the Roman Empire from the accession of the first emperor, Augustus, in the first century CE up to the Christianization of the Empire under Constantine in the fourth century CE. Our topics will include the physician-patient relationship and medical ethics, medical theory and Roman ideas about male and female physiology, urban public health concerns, and the impact of epidemic disease. We'll also read texts on magical and religious healing methods, which coexisted in the Empire with 'rational' approaches.
3582 FYSM-143-01 Sociology Through Film 1.00 SEM Andersson,Tanetta E. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  To the sociological eye, films represent social mirrors, illuminating the social order of our large social institutions, our interactions, our selves or identities, and inequalities between us. Students will connect key sociological works and thinkers to films like Antz, Modern Times, Office Space, Fight Club, Ex Machina, Meet The Parents, Tootsie, and Varsity Blues. Topics of focus will include the social structure of spaces where we live, work, and are entertained; the social construction of reality; how notions of 'I', 'me', and 'self' are fundamentally social in nature; and, how gender is an interactional accomplishment rather than a property of individuals, for example.
3568 FYSM-144-01 Food Science and Culture 1.00 SEM Guardiola-Diaz,Hebe M. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  This seminar is focused on food. We will study the physiology and neuroscience of food-seeking behavior and the impact of food preferences on our agricultural landscape and on our interaction with the environment. The dietary choices seem endless: conventional, organic, locally grown, genetically modified, etc. Which choices are compatible with optimal health? Which are sustainable? Will climate change force diversification of our diet? Can science enhance the nutritional value of food and bring justice to the hungry? We will be guided by popular writings by scientists and journalists and consider relevant data in scientific journals. But a seminar about food would be incomplete without enjoying food as a conduit for sociability and tickling of the senses. We will cook and we will eat!
3618 FYSM-147-01 ClimateChange:Science&Politics 1.00 SEM Gourley,Jonathan R. MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Are you climate literate? With the reality of climate change becoming more urgent, there is a greater need for scientists and non-scientists to be effective communicators of climate science to those who make important policy decisions This seminar will explore the well-establish, yet often misunderstood scientific evidence of our warming climate. We will cover how proxies are used to establish long-term climate patterns and compare the ancient record to the current system. Through recent literature, social media, and recent/current events, we will track how climate change science is interpreted by politicians and society.
3604 FYSM-152-01 In Search of a Good Life 1.00 SEM Sandoval,Mary MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Many philosophical and religious traditions, from the ancient stoics to modern day Buddhists, have attempted to answer the question of what makes for a good life. Modern disciplines as diverse as behavioral economics, positive psychology, and brain science have also sought to understand issues related to this question. In this seminar, we will examine what all these disciplines, both ancient and modern, have to say about what it means to have a good or happy life, examining the roles of freedom and choice, economic conditions, engagement in one's work, the pursuit of virtue and public service, and resilience in the face of adversity. Along the way, we will examine the contributions of modern brain science and positive psychology to this discussion. Mary Sandoval is a professor in the Department of Mathematics, where she has taught many courses across the departmental curriculum from calculus to the mathematics of special and general relativity. She has broad interests that include ancient philosophy, psychology, the science of the brain, and behavioral economics.
3605 FYSM-154-01 Who Am I, Anyway? 1.00 SEM Ewegen,Shane M. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  So you're off to college -- surely, by this point, you know who you are. And yet, as this class will quickly show, few issues remain more difficult and unsettled--and, indeed, unsettling--than the matter of the self. What is a self? What makes yours different from mine? What makes yours what it is? By reading a number of philosophical texts from a variety of thinkers, we will attempt to gain insight into the self through exploring some of the many social, philosophical, cultural, political, and technological forces that contribute to making you who you are.
3574 FYSM-157-01 CyclingSustainability&Hartford 1.50 SEM Del Puppo,Dario MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  In this course, we will examine the history and culture of cycling and its role in creating smart and sustainable cities. Cycling is also an integral part of the modern history of Hartford, the U.S. capital of bicycle production from 1880-1910. Using Hartford as a case in point, we will consider how cycling can positively affect transportation and contribute significantly to our quality of life. Students will explore Greater Hartford by bicycle and undertake an extra .5 credit internship or project dealing with some aspect of cycling culture in the city and/or with area organizations. The aim of the course is to engender creative and critical thinking about these issues, while introducing students to important cultural institutions and the many opportunities that the city of Hartford offers. Students who want to enroll in this seminar must be comfortable riding a bicycle in an urban setting. Also, students must bring their own bicycle or arrange for a bicycle when they arrive on campus. .
3575 FYSM-157-02 CyclingSustainability&Hartford 1.50 SEM Evelein,Johannes F. MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  In this course, we will examine the history and culture of cycling and its role in creating smart and sustainable cities. Cycling is also an integral part of the modern history of Hartford, the U.S. capital of bicycle production from 1880-1910. Using Hartford as a case in point, we will consider how cycling can positively affect transportation and contribute significantly to our quality of life. Students will explore Greater Hartford by bicycle and undertake an extra .5 credit internship or project dealing with some aspect of cycling culture in the city and/or with area organizations. The aim of the course is to engender creative and critical thinking about these issues, while introducing students to important cultural institutions and the many opportunities that the city of Hartford offers. Students who want to enroll in this seminar must be comfortable riding a bicycle in an urban setting. Also, students must bring their own bicycle or arrange for a bicycle when they arrive on campus. .
3554 FYSM-158-01 The Silk Road 1.00 SEM Hussain,Shafqat TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  This course will examine the history and cultures of the Silk Road, a trade route stretching from China to Europe. For more than two thousand years, the Silk Road acted as a zone of cultural transmission and long-distance interaction between merchants, soldiers, pilgrims, and nomads of the Mediterranean and Asian regions. We will read about the early efforts by the Chinese Han dynasty to control the trade route, Marco Polo’s visit to the court of Kublai Khan, and political intrigue and machination between Russia, Britain and China during the “Great Game” in the nineteenth century. We will take an ethnographic and historical approach to the “region” by looking at cultural strategies of various ethnic communities who have thrived and perished on the Silk Road.
3611 FYSM-159-01 Americans in Paris 1.00 SEM Kippur,Sara TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Americans visiting Paris today flock to the literary cafés of the Latin Quarter and the Impressionist paintings at the Musée d'Orsay, but how was it that Paris came to represent a cultural mecca for Americans? To what extent do American cities generally-and New York in particular-occupy a similar place in the cultural imaginary of Parisians? This course draws from an eclectic mix of materials-historical and literary texts, transatlantic correspondence, pop culture and comedy, music, films, political treatises, cultural theory-to examine some of the assumptions, prejudices, and cross-cultural influences that characterize Franco-American relations historically and today. Sample reading list includes works by James Baldwin, Simone de Beauvoir, Adam Gopnik, Ernest Hemingway, Henry Miller, David Sedaris, and Alexis de Tocqueville.
3570 FYSM-161-01 Bones,Pigments&Native Metals 1.00 SEM Parr,Maria L. WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA Y FYR3  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  This seminar will explore the importance of the physical sciences in art and archaeology. In particular, we will examine how the discovery and development of materials such as ceramics, metal alloys and pigments influenced artists and how they utilized these materials to create works of art. We will also consider a number of case studies where scientific analysis played a crucial role in the authentication or conservation of objects. Laboratory workshops and guest speakers from local museums and conservation laboratories will supplement the lectures, readings and discussions. A weekend visit to a local art museum will also be scheduled during the semester.
3623 FYSM-174-01 Peoples&Cultures of Himalayas 1.00 SEM Lestz,Michael E. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  NOTE: Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  This seminar will introduce the peoples and cultures of the Himalayan rim. Due to the vast popularity in the West of works by amateur investigators, religious enthusiasts, or mountaineers, the Himalayan lands are usually equated with stirring landscapes, Buddhist or Hindu practices, or ascents of eight thousand meter peaks. However, such records capture just a fragment of the complex experience of this region; sometimes what is left out is more important than what is included. Focusing largely on Tibet and Nepal, this course will provide a multi-dimensional way of understanding the ‘Third Pole’ or the Himalayas. An optional trek to Nepal with an attached 0.5 credit independent study unit is likely to be offered during the intersession (December 2016 to January 2017).
3616 FYSM-177-01 The Psychology of Happiness 1.00 SEM Helt,Molly TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  We all want to be happy and experience a meaningful life, but do we really know what happiness is? Does money make us happy, and if so, when and why? How do our relationships contribute to a feeling of meaning in life? What types of situations encourage cognitive mastery and creativity? Can happiness be learned, or is our happiness "setpoint" mostly determined by genetics? How do we, as a society, encourage generosity and altruism? The common theme for all of these topics is how we can use scholarly research in psychology to improve our everyday lives and strengthen our communities. Students will write opinion papers about scientific findings, conduct self experiments, and journal about their experiences in trying to apply these findings to their own lives.
3572 FYSM-181-01 The Beatles and the 60s 1.00 SEM Platoff,John MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  The Beatles were the most famous and influential musicians of the 20th century. Were they so successful because of their music? Their appearance? The rise of the “youth culture”? Or because of shrewd management? We will focus both on the Beatles’ music and on the group’s cultural significance. We will read about (and listen to) the Beatles, read their own words, and study the social upheavals of the 1960s in which their music played a part. Assessing the credibility of what we read will be central to our discussions. There will be a number of short papers and a final research project. No previous background in music is required; however, students choosing this seminar should already be familiar with the Beatles and their music.
3606 FYSM-184-01 The Art of Food (Writing) 1.00 SEM Wheatley,Chloe TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  To write about food is to write about life. This course will consider various types of food writing from a variety of perspectives, ranging from food's cultural significance, and the rituals and artistry associated with culinary production, to issues of food justice. Field trips (to local farm, restaurants, soup kitchen) will help to contextualize and localize our readings, which will include plays, films, poems and short stories, as well as classics of culinary nonfiction (restaurant reviews, essays, memoirs, and investigative journalism).
3610 FYSM-187-01 Race and Religion 1.00 SEM Koertner,Mareike MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Race and religion shape the identity of the individual and its surrounding society. But how do they do that? How do race and religion intersect? What role have they played in shaping our politics, cultures, and values? Do race and religion still matter today? This course looks at the ways race and religion have impacted the U.S. Among the many topics we will cover are the founding fathers' understanding of religious freedom and its race-related limits; the role religion played in justifying and objecting to slavery; the emergence of black religious movements; the Civil Rights Movement; and liberation theologies.
3576 FYSM-193-01 The Brothers Karamazov 1.00 SEM Any,Carol J. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  How do we choose between our basest and noblest passions? How do the warring sides of our personality affect our lifestyle choices and romantic relationships? One of the most philosophical and influential novels ever written, The Brothers Karamazov, explores human behavior at its extremes and asks who we are, and want to be, as human beings. In this masterpiece of Russian literature, Dostoyevsky explores our darkest urges - to dominate and humiliate others - but also probes the mystery of how these cruel instincts can coexist with compassion and self-sacrifice. We will interpret the text collaboratively, drawing on the insights of each student. Students will practice techniques for leading class discussion, and will also learn how to prepare literary analyses based on close reading and textual evidence.
3613 FYSM-195-01 The Biology of Science Fiction 1.00 SEM Fleming,Robert J. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course is intended for students who plan to enter into a science major.
  In this course we will examine classical and modern science fiction works that rely upon an underlying biological theme as the basis for the work. We will examine classical works such as The Andromeda Strain, Jurassic Park and The Martian along with lesser known science fiction stories to determine if each work is compatible with both current biological concepts and with current technology. If current technology is inadequate, what changes need be made for the work to have validity? Students will research the underlying biology of a work to determine if the author made logical extensions to available science in the writing of the story. We will also examine moral and ethical issues associated with the technologies presented in each work.
3608 FYSM-203-01 Rhetoric, Toys, and Identities 1.00 SEM Marino,Nicholas P. WF: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Toys and games are our first, physical contact with rhetoric. From them, we learn what our bodies should look like, whose identities are valued, and what behaviors we should model. To investigate and interrogate how toys and games shaped and continue to shape our identities, student will develop and employ primary and secondary research skills. Various writing projects¬- ranging from a traditional academic essay to a digital, multimodal presentation- will teach students to cultivate and sustain intellectual inquiry and present their research across several mediums and genres. We will also participate in dynamic experiential learning opportunities, such as remixing an existing toy and creating a Trinity College board game, which encourages students to engage critically with their peers, the campus, and the surrounding community.
3579 FYSM-204-01 Curiosity&Madness in Engl Lit 1.00 SEM Benedict,Barbara M. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  What do the stories of Pandora, Eve, and Alice in Wonderland have in common? Is curiosity a virtue or a sin in Western culture? When is someone "curious" and when is someone considered "a curiosity"? When does curiosity turn into "madness," however we define that? In this seminar, we will read English literature from all genres and all centuries (as well as seeing some films) about "curious" and "mad" people in order to explore what makes people curious and how the category of curiosity relates to madness. Readings will include Gothic mysteries and detective fictions; a play by Shakespeare; poetry and essays by British and American writers from the late Renaissance to the twenty-first centuries; and theory by Michel Foucault and others.
3614 FYSM-205-01 Scientific Method in Society 1.00 SEM Skardal,Per Sebastian MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This seminar will examine the role that science and the scientific method play in shaping our world and using their guiding principles in our own lives. We will examine the origins of rationalism and skepticism using fundamental works of figures like Descartes and Galileo, tracing our way to the scientific contributions of modern history and current events. Special emphasis will be placed on learning how to employ the scientific method in our own lives: making hypotheses, evaluating evidence, judging scientific (and non-scientific) literature, and reexamining assumptions to make sound conclusions and informed decisions about issues that we face daily.
3569 FYSM-210-01 HIV/AIDS: Science and Society 1.00 SEM Brindle,Cheyenne S. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Since its first official medical description in 1981, HIV/AIDS has rocked the scientific community, and society at large. In this class, we will examine the underlying chemistry and biology of HIV/AIDS, including the science behind commonly used antiretroviral drugs such as reverse transcriptase and entry inhibitors. The class will also explore the political, cultural, ethical, and other societal impacts of the epidemic. We will explore a variety of source materials and evaluate their function, impact, and reliability.
3609 FYSM-224-01 China's Forbidden City 1.00 SEM Sena,Yunchiahn C. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  As a political and cultural center in China since the mid-eleventh century BCE, Beijing is a site of numerous ancient remains and historical monuments. Now a mega city boasting a population of more than 21 million, Beijing is also known for its ultra-modern cityscape and futuristic lifestyle. How did this premodern Chinese capital become a contemporary international metropolis? This seminar examines the city's art and architecture in its rich historical, cultural and social context. From features commissioned by Chinese emperors in the past to those created by avant-garde artists today, we discuss the complex symbolism and underpinning ideologies that made the city and enable it continuing to be a unique locus for the intersection of political power, cultural ideals, artistic innovation, and the global market.
3581 FYSM-226-01 Free Speech: Drawing the Line 1.00 SEM Power,Katharine G. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Are you free to say what you want to say? How free should you be? What are your speech rights under the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution? These are the questions that will guide our study of the legal and moral implications of the current free speech debate in its impact on social media, public protest and campus discourse. Course readings and discussion will explore the philosophical principles that govern free speech protections as determined by the courts as well as arguments that favor speech regulations to ensure equal protection under the law for all members of society. We will also take a close look at the increasingly heated free speech controversies that have recently erupted on college campuses across the country.
3578 FYSM-229-01 Physics in Science Fiction 1.00 SEM Branning,David TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Science fiction has a long history of presenting speculations on the physical laws of the universe and the consequences of these laws for our lives and our civilization. Many of these speculations have turned out to be correct, others have proved spectacularly wrong, and some are so forward-looking that the verdict may not be known for centuries. We will read stories mostly in the "hard SF" tradition of Tom Godwin's "The Cold Equations" and Poul Anderson's "Tau Zero." Along with classic masters such as Arthur C. Clarke, Isaac Asimov, and Larry Niven, we will explore modern award-winning authors such as Greg Egan, David Marusek, and Ted Chiang. We will discuss how their stories explore scientific concepts, and we will incorporate these concepts into original written works.
3573 FYSM-233-01 Understanding Race 1.00 SEM Wade,Maurice L. WF: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  This seminar focuses on attempts by philosophers and other philosophically-minded thinkers to plumb the meaning and significance of race. Among the questions that the course will explore are: what is race; what has been/is the significance of race; should race continue to matter to us personally, politically, socially, etc.; is a post-racial society possible; what might a post-racial society be like? Reading assignments will be drawn from both historical and contemporary texts.
3580 FYSM-237-01 Understding&ReversingPrejudice 1.00 SEM Reuman,David A. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  What are the causes of prejudice and discrimination? Are prejudice and discrimination inevitable? Does prejudice always lead to discrimination? Is discrimination always a result of prejudice? Is the nature of prejudice universal, whether we consider group differences based on social class, race, religion, gender, politics, obesity, age, or any other status characteristic? Do strategies for reducing prejudice and discrimination follow the same principles, whether we are trying to reduce hate crimes or implement affirmative action programs in American institutions of higher education? Questions like these will be addressed in this seminar through use of literature, film, and social science readings, as well as regular in-class debates, discussions, and role-playing exercises.
3577 FYSM-243-01 Poetic Shape & Sound 1.00 SEM Berry,Ciaran M. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  You might know what a sonnet is, but would you recognize a villanelle or a sestina if you saw one? Have you any idea what a pantoum looks like or where a ghazal comes from? In this class we’ll examine, and then write in, a variety of poetic forms, learning about their cultural and historical origins, close-reading the best models available to us, and then using those models as a springboard towards poems of our own. In addition to producing original work, and reading a variety of poetry from throughout the ages, this seminar will engage students in the literary community at Trinity and beyond through attendance at readings and other related events, in class presentations, recitations, performances, and conversation with guest speakers.