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Course Listing for FIRST YEAR SEMINAR - Spring 2017
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Dist Qtr
5155 FYSM-251-01 Hons Sem: Race&Incar State 1.00 SEM Greenberg,Cheryl TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  #BlackLivesMatter has brought the intersection of race and the criminal justice system into public conversation, but race has been intertwined with imprisonment since American colonization. This course begins with the ways slavery and African Americans were policed by the state, and the history of American prisons. After the Civil War, freed black men and women sought equal rights and opportunities. In response, the justice system shifted to accommodate new forms of racial suppression. The course then considers civil rights activists’ experiences with prisons, the War on Drugs’ racial agenda, and Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow, which argued that the “prison-industrial complex” is the newest form of racial control. The course ends with #BLM and other challenges to the criminal justice system, and correspondence with current prisoners.
5158 FYSM-256-01 Honors Sem:History of the Book 1.00 SEM Elukin,Jonathan W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This course is open to first-year students only.
  We will explore the rare books of Trinity’s Watkinson Library. Among the topics we will study: the origins of writing, the transition from roll to code X forms of the book, the book in the Middle Ages, the impact of printing, the nature of reading in early modern Europe, and how we read in the digital age.
5156 FYSM-258-01 Hon Sem: Cinephilosophy 1.00 SEM Younger,James Prakash TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM
W: 6:30PM-9:30PM
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: The Wednesday evening meeting is a mandatory screening time.
  This course begins with an initiation into the mysteries of cinephilia through the films of the classic American auteur Howard Hawks and the critical writing of Jacques Rivette and Robin Wood. It then proceeds into a free-ranging exploration of philosophical texts and films designed to provoke creative thought, open-ended discussion, and elegant, poetic critical writing. With philosophers such as Plato and Nietzsche to challenge us, and and powerful films by Hitchcock, Bergman, Renoir, Von Trier, Cuaron, Ozu and Yang to provoke us, we will use the dialogical methodology of experimental cinephilia to explore some of the fundamental themes of human life.