COURSE SCHEDULE

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Only show courses available to first-year students!

Course Listing for FIRST YEAR SEMINAR - Spring 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2185 FYSM-252-01 Hon Sem:Making Hist Come Alive 1.00 SEM Kete,Kathleen W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This course is open to first-year students only.
  NOTE: Enrolled students who wish to drop this class should see Ms. Field in the First-Year Office and NOT the faculty member teaching this seminar.
  This course explores how novelists and filmmakers transform events from history into works of art. It begins by asking, when and why did the historical novel become part of our literary culture? What explains the popularity of historical films? The strategies by which historical novels are built will then be examined. Scenes from Tolstoy’s War and Peace and from Hilary Mantel’s recent and acclaimed novels about Thomas Cromwell, among other choices, will be read towards understanding the novelist’s craft. Influential films such as Lawrence of Arabia will be viewed towards understanding how the medium of adapts itself so readily to the narration of history. The course will end with a group project that sketches our own attempts to make history come alive through literary art.
2187 FYSM-254-01 Hon SemGeorge Orwell/His Times 1.00 SEM Rosen,David W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This course is open to first-year students only.
  NOTE: Enrolled students who wish to drop this class should see Ms. Field in the First-Year Office and NOT the faculty member teaching this seminar.
  Novelist, journalist, soldier, social-critic, policeman, bum: more than sixty years after his death, George Orwell’s stature as an interpreter of modern life is as high as it has ever been. Whether analyzing the structures of totalitarian power, or recounting the experience of his own education, or giving advice about how to write a good English sentence, Orwell let few aspects of daily existence escape his discriminating gaze. In this seminar we will read Orwell’s fiction and nonfiction, as well as the work of authors in many of the fields Orwell claimed as his own (e.g. literature, economics, philosophy, and politics). We will treat Orwell critically, as both a model for our own work (as writers, as intellectuals), and as a cautionary tale.
2186 FYSM-256-01 Honors Sem:History of the Book 1.00 SEM Elukin,Jonathan W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This course is open to first-year students only.
  NOTE: Enrolled students who wish to drop this class should see Ms. Field in the First-Year Office and NOT the faculty member teaching this seminar.
  This course is designed to give students an extensive introduction to issues in the history of the book, including: the origins of writing, the transition from roll to codex, medieval literacy and book technology, the impact of printing, the nature of reading in early modern Europe, and the future of the book in the digital age.