COURSE SCHEDULE

Click here to browse textbooks information at the bookstore's web site.

Browse the course schedule by:
Select a subject:
Select a level:
Select a term:
Only show courses available to first-year students!

Course Listing for FIRST YEAR SEMINAR - Fall 2016
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3584 FYSM-101-01 BFF or Strange Bedfellows? 1.00 SEM Spezialetti,Madalene TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Is the enemy of your enemy your friend, or will you need to make friends with your enemies? Will you use rhetoric, reason, persuasion, or just plain violence to get what you want? Leave your twenty-first century American sensibilities behind as you assume the roles of a member of an Athenian assembly in 403 B.C. and a member of the 1945 conference in Simla, India, to explore the timeless question of how much one should give up to get his or her political way. Using the role playing/game playing teaching paradigm of “Reacting to the Past,” your character’s political successes, failures and compromises will shape the outcome of “history.”
3647 FYSM-103-01 Letter-Email-Text Message 1.00 SEM Hager,Christopher MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Except for the few decades between the rise of telephones and the birth of the Internet, text has been the dominant medium of personal communication throughout U.S. history. Whether with quill and ink, typewriter, or smartphone, Americans have used the written word to forge, preserve, and strengthen relationships across distance. This seminar will survey cultures of letter-writing in the U.S. from the colonial period through the modern era. We will read private letters by Americans both famous and obscure; examine the ways written forms have shaped people's social and emotional lives; and consider how our own writing practices carry on or upend traditions of text-based communication. Students will undertake a research and editing project focused on a historical letter of their own choosing.
3644 FYSM-106-01 Social Media & Communication 1.00 SEM Catrino,Joseph M. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Social media is engrained into our everyday communication. The practice and use of social media and mobile technologies have significantly impacted our lives. This course will explore the complex relationship between social media and traditional communication skills. Mobile phones and tablets have become our constant companions. Because of this, literacy has shifted dramatically – how we read, research, write, collaborate, and present ideas and information has changed. Through the evaluation of common social media platforms and the evolving digital media industry, we will analyze how social media has dramatically altered the nature of human communication and how it impacts American society. The course will explore what it means to be digital media literate and successful in a social, academic, and professional context in the 21st century.
3618 FYSM-108-01 The Self and Human Nature 1.00 SEM Theurer,Kari L. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  In this course, we will examine a set of intertwined questions concerning the self and human nature. Is there such a thing as human nature? In the absence of a straightforward answer, we find a greater emphasis on classifying people into groups, including race and gender. Are these classifications grounded in reality? Is there an understanding of human nature that includes all humans, but excludes animals and computers? Does the self persist through time, or does it evolve over the course of one’s life or even from moment to moment? And exactly how free are we to shape who we are? We will investigate answers, both historical and contemporary, that philosophers have offered in response to these questions.
3630 FYSM-111-01 Photographing Hartford 1.00 SEM Delano,Pablo M: 1:00PM-4:00PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  This class is an introduction to the practice of documentary photography, with the city of Hartford as our subject. We will learn the basic functions of the digital camera and of photo-editing software (Photoshop). Students will choose one particular aspect of our city and photograph it intensely. Utilizing research, discussion and in-class critique we will improve our photo technique and grapple with the methodology of visual story telling. All photographing will be done independently, off-campus, within the city. You should be prepared to explore the city on your own: on foot, bike, via public transportation or by other means. DSLR camera required. Email instructor with questions about camera or course content.
3649 FYSM-113-01 Sports 1.00 SEM Alcorn,John MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  An introduction to social science of sports. We will examine collegiate, professional, individual, team, and international sports. Specific topics are: nature and nurture in athletic prowess, stakeholders (athletes, fans, owners, media, and sponsors), dysfunctions (bias, corruption, discrimination, doping, & violence), and governance (official rules and informal honor codes). An overarching question is: What are sports for? We will review answers from various disciplines in the liberal arts, and develop our own. Students will conduct policy debates, about pay-for-play for collegiate athletes, performance-enhancing drugs, and Title IX. The seminar mixes traditional meetings and experimental components, including public debates and workshops in which students learn to create polished virtual presentations of their final projects. There will be guest visits by experts from the field.
3576 FYSM-115-01 Math Ideas and Changing Times 1.00 SEM Georges,John P. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y FYR6  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  What is mathematics? There is no simple, timeless, or universal answer to this question. Over the years, mathematics has been shaped by, and has given shape to, many societal issues, including promoting the hegemony of nations, developing foreign trade, glorifying heroes through architecture, and understanding the nature of religion. We shall examine and discuss many aspects of this subject, both describing it and distinguishing it from others. Beginning with a comparative study of number systems, we trace the evolution of real numbers and observe surprising number patterns. Our journey will bring us to the threshold of infinity and to the consideration of transfinite numbers, as conceived by Cantor in the nineteenth century.
3635 FYSM-122-01 Humanities in a Digital Age 1.00 SEM Jones,Jason B. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Instead of arguing about or on the internet, what if we think with it? What happens when we use computational methods to understand literature? Or when we bring literary or historical methods to contemporary, born-digital cultural works? This seminar will introduce a variety of tools and techniques for interpreting and understanding cultural artifacts of all sorts. Along the way, we will try to understand what the humanities have been, some things they seem to be becoming, and why there always seems to be a crisis about them. Topics to be covered include close/distant reading, text analysis and topic modeling, visualization tools, 3D printing, and more. No prior computing experience required.
3631 FYSM-125-01 Controversy in Economic Policy 1.00 SEM Szembrot,Nichole E. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Why do people disagree about economic policy? In this course, students will explore different perspectives on several important issues, including the minimum wage, affirmative action, health care reform, and immigration. We will deconstruct positions held by different people and groups, with the goal of understanding where common ground can be found and where differences remain. Through reading, writing, and engaging in respectful discussions with their classmates, students will come to better understand both their own opinions and the opinions of others. Students will also learn how to use logic and evidence to support an argument.
3634 FYSM-131-01 NaturePhotography&Conservation 1.00 SEM Geiss,Christoph MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM
W: 1:15PM-3:55PM
TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Nature photography has played a major role in national and international conservation efforts. Ansel Adams’ photographs of National Parks excited the American public about the West and were instrumental in the establishment of National Parks across America. Today photography is still used to promote environmental causes, but it also attracts large numbers of visitors to distant, often fragile places, thus aiding in the destruction of environments that it intended to protect. This seminar will explore the role of art in conservation. Students will have several opportunities to take digital photographs, and our art will help the KNOX Park Foundation to promote their work in urban gardens and parks.
3580 FYSM-134-01 Games of Strategy 1.00 SEM Schneider,Arthur M. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  In this seminar we will learn about games and their predictions of rational human behavior. We will run a series of bargaining and social dilemma games to test whether these predictions are indeed true. Our goal will be to study how people actually behave in economic settings, not how we think they should behave. We will address the importance of monetary incentives in experimental economics and determine how to properly incentivize our own experiments. We will discuss the relevance and applicability of our experiments outside of economics. Finally, students will be required to design and conduct their own game experiments. No previous background in economics or game theory is required to take this course.
3683 FYSM-135-01 Turbulent Tropics: Brazil 1.00 SEM Hubert,Maria Del Rosario TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  NOTE: This course is taught in English.
  What does literature, cinema or art tell us about the history, traditions or current affairs of a given culture? The goal of this course is to introduce students to study of Brazil through films and texts in translation. As the largest country in South America, with a multicultural population and a global geopolitical projection -like the recent Olympic Games-, Brazil has been through a rich but turbulent history. In the light of events such as colonization, slavery, modernization, dictatorship or environmental degradation, we will reflect upon the past and present of Brazilian culture. The aim of the course is to introduce students to this fascinating region of Latin America, but mostly, to provide them with critical tools to analyze foreign languages and cultures.
3629 FYSM-137-01 Arabian Nights 1.00 SEM Antrim,Zayde MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Have you ever wondered where flying carpets and genies come from? Do the names Aladdin or Sindbad ring a bell? This seminar will trace the development of the fantastical story collection known in the Middle East as The Thousand and One Nights and popularized in Europe and the United States as The Arabian Nights. We will discuss what these stories meant for the Middle Eastern societies that kept them alive for centuries, as well as how they have been re-packaged for modern audiences. By reading selections from the earliest manuscripts and considering later versions and film adaptations, we will explore topics such as the role of magic and humor and the question of racial, sexual, and religious stereotypes in the history of this famous work.
3620 FYSM-140-01 Ethical Dilemmas through Film 1.00 SEM Dunlap,Kent D. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  In this course, we will examine several sets of contemporary ethical issues as they are presented in films. These include ethical dilemmas in the areas of medicine, biomedical research, privacy and surveillance, immigration, race, war, and religion. Films will be both fiction and documentary. We will discuss complementary readings and hold in-class debates on these issues. We will also interact with Hartford-area agencies confronting these issues. Students will write papers on each ethical dilemma, including a research paper on one particular ethical issue.
3637 FYSM-143-01 Sociology Through Film 1.00 SEM Andersson,Tanetta E. F: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  How can we understand American society more deeply through film? In this course, students will view classics like Modern Times, and many contemporary films including Office Space, Friday Night Lights, Roger and Me, The Matrix, Tootsie, Antz, Nell, Meet the Parents, Borat, Boys Don’t Cry, Fight Club, and Her. Together with sociological readings, students will examine how historical shifts in societies’ economic structure influenced other social institutions; what holds society together and what creates conflict and alienation; the costs of increasing bureaucracy in society; how race is a social construction, yet deeply structured into our society; how gender is an interactional accomplishment; how our notions of ‘I’, ‘me’, and ‘self’ are fundamentally social in nature, yet shifting with rapidly changing technology.
3672 FYSM-149-01 The American Founding 1.00 SEM Smith,Gregory TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA FYR1  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  The seminar will commence with a brief consideration of the philosophical threads that lead into the Founding Era including Lockean, Classical Republican, Christian/Reformation, Civic Humanist, Covenant theories, Scottish Enlightenment, and Montesquieu leading up to a reading of the Declaration of Independence. We will then focus on the actual debates at the Constitutional Convention; move to a consideration of the ratification debates focusing on the Federalist Papers and various Anti-Federalist responses; and then read letters and essays from the Founders in the period after ratification leading up to the end of the Founding Era with John Marshal's decision in Marbury v. Madison. There will be a series of weekly papers leading up to a term essay.
3621 FYSM-152-01 Evolution, Sex & Human Nature 1.00 SEM Blackburn,Daniel G. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  For nearly 4 billion years, life has been evolving on our planet, and has given rise to an astonishing diversity of animals, plants, and microbes. While evidence for life’s evolution is overwhelming, the extent to which Darwin’s principle of natural selection explains particular features of the human species remains controversial. In this seminar, we shall explore the phenomena and major events that have shaped the history of life and our own species. In particular, we will focus on the controversial use of evolutionary ideas to explain attributes of human nature, including different “reproductive strategies” of males and females, as well as human health problems, dietary preferences, and physical diversity. Classes will focus on discussion of readings as well as videos and student presentations.
3577 FYSM-157-01 CyclingSustainability&Hartford 1.50 SEM Del Puppo,Dario MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  In this course, we will examine the history and culture of cycling and its role in creating smart and sustainable cities. Cycling is also an integral part of the modern history of Hartford, the U.S. capital of bicycle production from 1880-1910. Using Hartford as a case in point, we will consider how cycling can positively affect transportation and contribute significantly to our quality of life. Students will explore Greater Hartford by bicycle and undertake an extra .5 credit internship or project dealing with some aspect of cycling culture in the city and/or with area organizations. The aim of the course is to engender creative and critical thinking about these issues, while introducing students to important cultural institutions and the many opportunities that the city of Hartford offers. Students who want to enroll in this seminar must be comfortable riding a bicycle in an urban setting and preferably be able to bring their own bicycle to campus.
3578 FYSM-157-02 CyclingSustainability&Hartford 1.50 SEM Evelein,Johannes MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  In this course, we will examine the history and culture of cycling and its role in creating smart and sustainable cities. Cycling is also an integral part of the modern history of Hartford, the U.S. capital of bicycle production from 1880-1910. Using Hartford as a case in point, we will consider how cycling can positively affect transportation and contribute significantly to our quality of life. Students will explore Greater Hartford by bicycle and undertake an extra .5 credit internship or project dealing with some aspect of cycling culture in the city and/or with area organizations. The aim of the course is to engender creative and critical thinking about these issues, while introducing students to important cultural institutions and the many opportunities that the city of Hartford offers. Students who want to enroll in this seminar must be comfortable riding a bicycle in an urban setting and preferably be able to bring their own bicycle to campus.
3582 FYSM-161-01 Bones,Pigments&Native Metals 1.00 SEM Parr,Maria L. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA Y FYR3  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  This seminar will explore the importance of the physical sciences in art and archaeology. In particular, we will examine how the discovery and development of materials such as ceramics, metal alloys and pigments influenced artists and how they utilized these materials to create works of art. We will also consider a number of case studies where scientific analysis played a crucial role in the authentication or conservation of objects. Laboratory workshops and guest speakers from local museums and conservation laboratories will supplement the lectures, readings and discussions. A weekend visit to a local art museum will also be scheduled during the semester.
3622 FYSM-168-01 Exploring Digital Spaces 1.00 SEM Tarsa,Rebecca G. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Digital spaces play an increasingly central role in our lives. And just as with physical spaces, navigating them is not always as straightforward as it appears. This seminar examines the political, social, and cultural stakes of making and moving through digital space. Students will explore firsthand a range of such spaces: from video games to virtual communities, including commercial spaces like Amazon and Etsy. They will also talk with researchers and designers working in these spaces about their experiences (via a series of Skype visits). Through these experiences, as well as readings from contemporary scholarship, the course examines issues of identity and power dynamics online; the role of visual design in online participation; and the relationship between digital spaces and the “real” world.
3676 FYSM-174-01 Peoples&Cultures of Himalayas 1.00 SEM Lestz,Michael E. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  This seminar will introduce the peoples and cultures of the Himalayan rim. Due to the vast popularity in the West of works by amateur investigators, religious enthusiasts, or mountaineers, the Himalayan lands are usually equated with stirring landscapes, Buddhist or Hindu practices, or ascents of eight thousand meter peaks. However, such records capture just a fragment of the complex experience of this region; sometimes what is left out is more important than what is included. Focusing largely on Tibet and Nepal, this course will provide a multi-dimensional way of understanding the ‘Third Pole’ or the Himalayas. An optional trek to Nepal with an attached 0.5 credit independent study unit is likely to be offered during the intersession (December 2016 to January 2017).
3588 FYSM-179-01 The World of Rare Books 1.00 SEM Ring,Richard J. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  This course is a guided tour of the world of rare books, a subculture with its own jargon, etiquette, and lore that offers insights into our value systems. Topics include the 600-year history of the printed book, book collecting by individuals and institutions in America, bibliophilic clubs and societies, rare book dealers, book fairs, auctions, thefts and forgeries, and rare book libraries. Our laboratory will be the Watkinson Library, which holds the rare books, manuscripts, and archives of Trinity college—almost 200,000 books produced over ten centuries, which sit on over five miles of shelving!
3585 FYSM-181-01 The Beatles and the 60s 1.00 SEM Platoff,John MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  The Beatles were the most famous and influential musicians of the 20th century. Were they so successful because of their music? Their appearance? The rise of the “youth culture”? Or because of shrewd management? We will focus both on the Beatles’ music and on the group’s cultural significance. We will read about (and listen to) the Beatles, read their own words, and study the social upheavals of the 1960s in which their music played a part. Assessing the credibility of what we read will be central to our discussions. There will be a number of short papers and a final research project. No previous background in music is required; however, students choosing this seminar should already be familiar with the Beatles and their music.
3589 FYSM-182-01 France: Age of Cathedral&Kings 1.00 SEM Cadogan,Jean W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Gothic cathedrals were built to inspire awe and still do. This course will explore the monuments of late Medieval France in their artistic, social and political contexts. It will focus on the emergence of Gothic style in the cathedrals of the Isle de France, including St. Denis, Chartres, Notre Dame de Paris, Amiens and Reims; but it will also consider building types such as hospitals, palaces, and abbeys. Ceremonies in the courts of Burgundy and Paris will also be discussed as settings for display and exchange of gifts. The afterlife of medieval monuments and changing views of them will also be approached from the perspectives of literature, imagery and restoration. Students taking this seminar will have priority in application for study abroad at the Trinity campus in Paris.
3583 FYSM-191-01 International Intervention 1.00 SEM Lefebvre,Thomas X. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  This seminar will offer students the opportunity to explore the current academic and political debate on international intervention. The course will provide students with some basic concepts of international relations and international law. Who, when, under which circumstances, and under which legal framework is it legitimate for a state, a coalition or an international organization to intervene internationally? This seminar will provide students the opportunity to engage with this complex topic through a variety of learning experiments including group projects, building networks with activists/researchers, and presentations.
3632 FYSM-200-01 The City as Work of Art 1.00 SEM Curran,Kathleen A. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  From ancient Athens and Rome to modern Paris, cities have been prime sites for cultural, artistic, and architectural production. Using case studies of such cities as Athens, Rome, Florence, Amsterdam, Mexico City, London, Paris, Berlin, New York, and Chicago, the course will examine high moments of cultural and historic achievement from the fifth century BCE to the modern world. The focus will be on pivotal social and artistic moments in western culture (for example, seventeenth-century Holland; nineteenth-century Paris), but we will focus on artistic production (architecture, city planning, and fine arts).
3624 FYSM-210-01 HIV/AIDS: Science and Society 1.00 SEM Brindle,Cheyenne S. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Since its first official medical description in 1981, HIV/AIDS has rocked the scientific community, and society at large. In this class, we will examine the underlying chemistry and biology of HIV/AIDS, including the science behind commonly used antiretroviral drugs such as reverse transcriptase and entry inhibitors. The class will also explore the political, cultural, ethical, and other societal impacts of the epidemic. We will explore a variety of source materials and evaluate their function, impact, and reliability.
3626 FYSM-211-01 The Plot Thickens 1.00 SEM Rutherford,Ethan MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  In this seminar we will address two basic questions of storytelling: how does plot work, and why is it so essential? As Tolstoy points out, fiction thrives on interruption, and our investigation into plot will begin with his famous dictum that “all great literature is one of two stories; a man goes on a journey or a stranger comes to town.” We’ll trace this theory through the close reading of short stories, critical essays, novels, and film. The questions we’ll ask—what makes a good story? How do you grab a reader’s attention, and compel her to turn the page? How does plot produce meaning?—will then inform our own creative work, a portfolio of which will be due at the end of the semester.
3625 FYSM-222-01 The Science behind DSP 1.00 SEM Cheng,Lin TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  NOTE: Students enrolling in this seminar should receive Math Placement for MATH 131 (Calculus I) or MATH 207 (Statistics).
  Students in this seminar will use engineering problem-solving approaches to understand the science and quantify the challenges behind digital signal processing (DSP) systems. This course will expose students to a wide range of scientific methods that can symbolize different types of signals which can be efficiently stored, transmitted, and processed by computers. Students will apply mathematical and scientific concepts to hands-on projects with computer programming. This course also includes a series of writing assignments and a comprehensive final research paper. The required background includes proficiency in complex numbers, trigonometry, and logarithms from high school algebra and geometry.
3619 FYSM-225-01 Borderlands of East & SE Asia 1.00 SEM Notar,Beth E. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  What is a border? A boundary? A frontier? What does it mean to cross national, cultural, and ethnic borders? This course will examine these questions by looking at the borderlands between China and Southeast Asia, one of the most ethnically diverse places in the world. We will discuss such topics as self-determination, environmental degradation, ethno-tourism, prostitution, drug smuggling and HIV/AIDS in this region. Where appropriate, we will engage in comparative discussion of the US borders and border crossings. Readings will include ethnographies, memoirs and novels, and will be complemented by documentary and feature films.
3617 FYSM-230-01 Francophone Hartford 1.00 SEM Kippur,Sara TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  The French-speaking—or what we call “Francophone”—world extends far beyond France itself, to regions in the Caribbean, North and Sub-Saharan Africa, and Canada that were former French colonies. This course studies the culture, history, politics, and literature of these regions and places students in active and engaged conversation with the variety of Francophone communities in the Hartford area. We will explore, both in our readings and through class projects, how conceptions of identity, language, race and religion take shape in former French colonies and in the French-speaking diaspora. How, for example, do Francophone communities maintain and reimagine culture when they relocate to the US? The course combines close study of historical, literary, and pop culture texts with field projects that will connect students with Hartford as an urban center. Knowledge of French not required but a plus.
3636 FYSM-235-01 Theories of Leadership 1.00 SEM Chambers,Stefanie TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Leadership means different things to people. For some, the idea of leadership centers on elective office. For others, the term suggests activism around specific social issues, business, or the non-profit sector. Theories about leadership and the skills necessary to be a leader will be analyzed. We will consider the challenges and opportunities for individuals trying to achieve new leadership positions. Issues of race, ethnicity, class, gender and sexuality will also be considered as they relate to leadership. Outside speakers, fieldtrips and consultation with career development experts will help students create their own strategic leadership plan. This course will also allow students to work outside of class with a group of 6th graders from a local Hartford school to create leadership workshops for these students.
3581 FYSM-237-01 Understding&ReversingPrejudice 1.00 SEM Reuman,David A. MF: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  What are the causes of prejudice and discrimination? Are prejudice and discrimination inevitable? Does prejudice always lead to discrimination? Is discrimination always a result of prejudice? Is the nature of prejudice universal, whether we consider group differences based on social class, race, religion, gender, politics, obesity, age, or any other status characteristic? Do strategies for reducing prejudice and discrimination follow the same principles, whether we are trying to reduce hate crimes or implement affirmative action programs in American institutions of higher education? Questions like these will be addressed in this seminar through use of literature, film, and social science readings, as well as regular in-class debates, discussions, and role-playing exercises.
3627 FYSM-248-01 Harry Potter's Literary Past 1.00 SEM Bilston,Sarah R. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  This course places the seven Harry Potter novels in literary context, examining the evolution of British children’s literature in the twentieth century. We’ll explore works by authors including E. Nesbit, Enid Blyton, J.R.R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, T.H. White, Elizabeth Goudge, and Diana Wynne Jones in order to understand the preoccupations and drivers of fantasy, school, and adventure literature. At the end of the course we’ll read Rowling’s novels afresh as products of and creative interventions into a rich literary tradition. The seminar offers a first taste, then, of what will become your Trinity experience -- an opportunity not only to learn new things, but also to deepen and render more complex what you think you already know.
3587 FYSM-249-01 Art & Identity Politics 1.00 SEM Valentino,Erin MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  What does it mean to make art about who you are? How do visual artists use their mediums to tell their stories, engage with meaningful communities, and create social change? In this course, we will consider the ways that contemporary art represents social markers of difference like race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality—to name just some. We will gain a foundation in our study of feminist and queer art history, and of artists’ participation in the Civil Rights movement. Moving forward into 21st century, we will look at how artists address the issue of social identity in the context of globalization. Readings will come from a variety of critical sources. Several field trips on Saturdays will be required for the course.
3643 FYSM-294-01 Intro to Hebrew & Israeli Cult 1.00 SEM Ayalon,Michal MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  NOTE: This course is equivalent to Hebrew 101
  Hebrew is unique: after 2000 years when nobody spoke it, it was resurrected in Israel into full and vigorous life. Learn about how this took place, and how this ancient tongue now can say anything you can say in English or any other language. Now, Israel is a dynamic multi-faceted society made up of people from many different ethnic groups and nationalities. Hebrew is the common language of all those who live there. This course rigorously addresses the four language skills – listening, speaking, reading and writing, while at the same time, focuses on Israeli culture through, film, television, music, and food. No previous knowledge of Hebrew required.
3579 FYSM-295-01 Intro to Italian Lang&Culture 1.50 SEM Palma,Giuliana MW: 11:00AM-11:50AM
T: 10:50AM-11:40AM
R: 10:50AM-12:05PM
TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  To fully understand and appreciate Italy, its people and its culture, one must have a good grasp of the language. This course, integrates an intensive study of basic Italian with an overview of contemporary Italian culture. Some of the topics that will be explored in the course are: the international appeal of Italian art, cinema, design, food, sports, and music, immigration, globalization and Italy’s political role in the Mediterranean region. Students will be encouraged to apply their basic knowledge of Italian to their reading assignments and to consider the ways the language is a window on Italian culture.