COURSE SCHEDULE

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Course Listing for FIRST YEAR SEMINAR - Fall 2014
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
3390 FYSM-101-01 BFF or Strange Bedfellows? 1.00 SEM Spezialetti,Madalene TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Is the enemy of your enemy your friend, or will you need to make friends with your enemies? Will you use rhetoric, reason, persuasion, or just plain violence to get what you want? Leave your twenty-first century American sensibilities behind as you assume the roles of a member of an Athenian assembly in 403 B.C. and a member of the 1945 conference in Simla, India, to explore the timeless question of how much one should give up to get his or her political way. Using the role playing/game playing teaching paradigm of “Reacting to the Past,” your character’s political successes, failures and compromises will shape the outcome of “history.”
3391 FYSM-105-01 Prohibitions 1.00 SEM Alcorn,John MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 14 Waitlist available: N
  This seminar tackles two questions: Why do we outlaw some consensual behaviors by adults? And should we? We will examine “vices” (alcohol, drugs, and gambling), “repugnant markets” (commerce in sex, organs for transplantation, and adoption), and prohibitions against guns, advertising, and open international labor migration. Students will learn fundamentals of social science and will practice constructing perspicuous arguments. To punctuate the course, students will conduct policy debates during Trinity’s Common Hour. This is an experimental First-Year seminar that mixes traditional seminar meetings, public debates, multimedia instruction, and workshops in which students will learn to create polished virtual presentations of their final projects.
3395 FYSM-107-01 Dangerous Decisions 1.00 SEM Barlow,Rachael E. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  In the next few years, you will be asked to make many decisions. What courses will you take? What major will you declare? What clubs will you join? Will you study abroad? Will you go to graduate school or get a job? On the face of it, most Americans are thrilled to have so much opportunity to direct their future. At the same time, having so many choices can be terrifying. In this seminar, we will explore how individuals go about making decisions and discussing how individuals feel about their choices before and after they make them. To learn more about decision making, we will be collecting our own data about how others make decisions and then write about the data we collect.
3374 FYSM-111-01 Blurng Boundars in Studio Arts 1.00 SEM Tillman,Patricia W: 1:00PM-4:00PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  One could argue that installation art is not a “new” visual art genre, but rather a recent manifestation of an old practice that dates back to prehistoric cave paintings at Lascaux. In this old context as well as in a contemporary art installation, there is a connection to real experience and a blurring between art and life. A blurring of boundaries also takes place within different practices of studio arts. In this seminar, students will explore the visual language of art through two and three-dimensional media in the setting of Broad Street Gallery, a Trinity-owned gallery run by the Studio Arts Program. Students will be given both written and studio assignments that engage critical thinking skills and creative problem solving.
3393 FYSM-115-01 Math Ideas and Changing Times 1.00 SEM Georges,John P. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y FYR6  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  NOTE: Students are expected to have solid algebra skills, as reflected in a satisfactory performance on the math placement examination.
  What is mathematics? There is no simple, timeless, or universal answer to this question. Over the years, mathematics has been shaped by, and has given shape to, many societal issues, including promoting the hegemony of nations, developing foreign trade, glorifying heroes through architecture, and understanding the nature of religion. We shall examine and discuss many aspects of this subject, both describing it and distinguishing it from others. Beginning with a comparative study of number systems, we trace the evolution of real numbers and observe surprising number patterns. Our journey will bring us to the threshold of infinity and to the consideration of transfinite numbers, as conceived by Cantor in the nineteenth century.
3356 FYSM-116-01 Civiliz, Culture & Conservat 1.00 SEM Morrison,Joan TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Throughout our existence, humans have relied on nature and natural resources to sustain our societies. Yet as the human population continues to expand, our collective ecological footprint is causing changes of unprecedented scope and magnitude to the natural world on which we depend. How can humans live more sustainably with the natural world? This seminar will examine interrelationships among humans and the planet's biodiversity by exploring topics in biology, history, economics, energy, and agriculture. We will also explore aspects of our culture that have influenced ways in which we perceive and interact with our environment. Seminar activities will include readings, group discussions, written assignments, off-campus field trips, community involvement and student presentations.
3414 FYSM-128-01 Slavery, Property, Piracy 1.00 SEM Kamola,Isaac A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Since the publication of Defoe’s novel, Robinson Crusoe has served as the paradigmatic example of “economic man.” Classical and neoclassical economists, for example, offer Crusoe as the perfect example of a rational person mixing his labor with nature to create private property. The Crusoe story, however, cannot be disaggregated from the history of European imperial expansion in the Caribbean, and the piracy and transatlantic slavery that accompanied it. Through a reading of Defoe’s novel, various economic theorists who draw upon the figure of Crusoe, postcolonial critiques of the novel, historical accounts of the colonization of the Americas, and contemporary examples of slavery and piracy (including human trafficking and Somali piracy), this course revisits the question: How should we understand the relationship between slavery, property, and piracy?
3357 FYSM-134-01 Games of Strategy 1.00 SEM Schneider,Arthur M. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  In this seminar we will learn about games and their predictions of rational human behavior. We will run a series of bargaining and social dilemma games to test whether these predictions are indeed true. Our goal will be to study how people actually behave in economic settings, not how we think they should behave. We will address the importance of monetary incentives in experimental economics and determine how to properly incentivize our own experiments. We will discuss the relevance and applicability of our experiments outside of economics. Finally, students will be required to design and conduct their own game experiments. No previous background in economics or game theory is required to take this course.
3358 FYSM-136-01 Truth, Lies, Politics 1.00 SEM Maxwell,Lida E. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  In this course, we will examine contemporary theoretical and literary texts that thematize the problems surrounding truth and lies in politics. We will ask, what kind of truth, if any, has a role to play in politics and what kinds of practices sustain the value of truth-telling in politics? While lying is certainly dangerous to politics, might modes of speech and political action that are not reducible to truth-telling – for example, rhetoric, storytelling, and political movements – be important and necessary to our ability to see, value, and respond to the truth politically?
3359 FYSM-141-01 Battles of Faith and Reason 1.00 SEM Assaiante,Julia Goesser MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Though proceeding from a common desire to make sense of the world, faith and reason often stand in antagonistic opposition. This seminar examines some key theoretical underpinnings to the intricate relationship between faith (broadly understood as a faith in God) and reason (broadly understood as the use of critical thinking to ascertain truth) in the western theological and philosophical traditions. Topics of special interest will be the natures of faith and rational inquiry, belief in God, language, epistemology and history- in short, much of what makes life interesting! Among the thinkers this seminar will examine are Plato, Aquinas, Descartes, Hume, Kant, Nietzsche, Newman and Pope John Paul II. Our methodology will include the close reading of primary texts, as well as engaged interaction through dialogue and writing.
3362 FYSM-146-01 Guilty Pleasures 1.00 SEM Bergren,Katherine L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  In a recent manifesto critiquing the term “guilty pleasure,” journalist Jennifer Szalai described it as “a need that’s met, almost despite oneself, rather than a pleasure one freely chooses.” Examples of such cultural consumption vary: one person’s celebrity magazine is another’s romantic comedy. What these examples have in common is their imagined opposition to artifacts of high culture: songs, films, and books that promise elevation and edification. But although the distinction between high and low culture isn’t new, the term “guilty pleasure” didn’t become prevalent until the 1990s. In this seminar we will consume high and low art and introduce ourselves to aesthetic theory in order to investigate what makes certain pleasures seem worthwhile and others guilty, and what they tell us about contemporary American culture.
3387 FYSM-157-01 CyclingSustainability&Hartford 1.50 SEM Del Puppo,Dario MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  In this course, we will examine the history and culture of cycling and its role in creating smart and sustainable cities. Cycling is also an integral part of the modern history of Hartford, the U.S. capital of bicycle production from 1880-1910. Using Hartford as a case in point, we will consider how cycling can positively affect transportation and contribute significantly to our quality of life. Students will explore Greater Hartford by bicycle and undertake an extra .5 credit internship or project dealing with some aspect of cycling culture in the city and/or with area organizations. The aim of the course is to engender creative and critical thinking about these issues, while introducing students to important cultural institutions and the many opportunities that the city of Hartford offers. Students who want to enroll in this seminar must be comfortable riding a bicycle in an urban setting and preferably be able to bring their own bicycle to campus.
3388 FYSM-157-02 CyclingSustainability&Hartford 1.50 SEM Evelein,Johannes MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  In this course, we will examine the history and culture of cycling and its role in creating smart and sustainable cities. Cycling is also an integral part of the modern history of Hartford, the U.S. capital of bicycle production from 1880-1910. Using Hartford as a case in point, we will consider how cycling can positively affect transportation and contribute significantly to our quality of life. Students will explore Greater Hartford by bicycle and undertake an extra .5 credit internship or project dealing with some aspect of cycling culture in the city and/or with area organizations. The aim of the course is to engender creative and critical thinking about these issues, while introducing students to important cultural institutions and the many opportunities that the city of Hartford offers. Students who want to enroll in this seminar must be comfortable riding a bicycle in an urban setting and preferably be able to bring their own bicycle to campus.
3363 FYSM-158-01 The Silk Road 1.00 SEM Hussain,Shafqat TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  This course will examine the history and cultures of the Silk Road, a trade route stretching from China to Europe. For more than two thousand years, the Silk Road acted as a zone of cultural transmission and long-distance interaction between merchants, soldiers, pilgrims, and nomads of the Mediterranean and Asian regions. We will read about the early efforts by the Chinese Han dynasty to control the trade route, Marco Polo’s visit to the court of Kublai Khan, and political intrigue and machination between Russia, Britain and China during the “Great Game” in the nineteenth century. We will take an ethnographic and historical approach to the “region” by looking at cultural strategies of various ethnic communities who have thrived and perished on the Silk Road.
3364 FYSM-161-01 Bones,Pigments&Native Metals 1.00 SEM Parr,Maria L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y FYR3  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  This seminar will explore the importance of the physical sciences in art and archaeology. In particular, we will examine how the discovery and development of materials such as ceramics, metal alloys and pigments influenced artists and how they utilized these materials to create works of art. We will also consider a number of case studies where scientific analysis played a crucial role in the authentication or conservation of objects. Laboratory workshops and guest speakers from local museums and conservation laboratories will supplement the lectures, readings and discussions. A weekend visit to a local art museum will also be scheduled during the semester.
3385 FYSM-164-01 Representations of Autism(s) 1.00 SEM Paulin,Diana R. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  With increased visibility and diagnosis rates (1 in 50), autism spectrum disorders constitute a vital part of our nation’s fabric. Because it crosses boundaries, regardless of ethnicity, race, or socioeconomic status and because of its pervasiveness, a critical study of autism representations provides an instructive site for exploring overlapping commonalities and differences in U.S. culture. We will consider how shifting definitions of disability/ability contribute to our understanding of central values/beliefs, such as normalcy, success, humanity, and progress. How do representations and lived experiences frame our society’s understanding of identity, community, citizenship, agency, equality and humanity? Texts include fiction, memoir, film, poetry, print news, periodicals, legal documents, theoretical articles, television, internet media. Some titles include, Rainman and Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime.
3365 FYSM-167-01 Landscape Photog & Atmos Phys 1.00 SEM Geiss,Christoph T: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  In this seminar we will use photography to explore landscapes and physics to deepen our understanding of what we photograph. Topics include the changing quality of light throughout the day, the physics of rainbows, or why many photographers don’t like polarizing filters on wide-angle lenses. Our seminar will include several opportunities to take landscape photographs at locations nearby, as well as a three-day photography trip to the White Mountains over Trinity Days (Oct. 11-13 – please plan accordingly). At the end of the semester we will present our work in an exhibition on campus.
3366 FYSM-170-01 Phage Hunt 1.00 SEM Guardiola-Diaz,Hebe M.
Fleming,Robert J.
TR: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA Y FYR3  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  NOTE: This course is only open to students in the Genomics Research Program. It must be taken concurrently with Biol. 182.
  Students carry out individual research to discover and describe a previously unknown bacterial virus (phage) from environmental samples. Students learn to isolate their own phage and characterize the unique viral growth patterns on host bacteria. Students prepare phage for viewing with the electron microscope and isolate as well as analyze the phage genomic DNA. Data collected by each student becomes part of the national database on mycobacteriophage, contributing to the body of scientific knowledge. Critical thinking, analysis, and intensive writing practices are integral to the course.
3383 FYSM-174-01 Modern Climate Change 1.00 SEM Krisch,Maria J. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  In the 1890’s the chemist Svante Arrhenius predicted that the energy use associated with industrialization could change our climate. Today, scientists are watching this occur in real time. Dealing with this issue represents a major societal challenge for the upcoming century. We will discuss the scientific basis for climate change and examine projections for future climate. We will study the advantages and disadvantages of various energy sources, as well as the research being done into climate change mitigation. We will also examine the intersection of science and politics as it plays out in this issue. The course will incorporate role-playing methodology to reenact the 2009 Climate Change conference in Copenhagen. It will also include selected laboratory experiments.
3380 FYSM-179-01 The World of Rare Books 1.00 SEM Ring,Richard J. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  This course is a guided tour of the world of rare books, a subculture with its own jargon, etiquette, and lore that offers insights into our value systems. Topics include the 1500-year history of the “codex” book, book collecting by individuals and institutions in America, bibliophilic clubs and societies, rare book dealers, book fairs, auctions, thefts and forgeries, and rare book libraries. Our laboratory will be the Watkinson Library, which holds the rare books, manuscripts, and archives of Trinity college—almost 200,000 books produced over ten centuries, which sit on over five miles of shelving!
3389 FYSM-181-01 The Beatles and the 60s 1.00 SEM Platoff,John MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 14 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  The Beatles were the most famous and influential musicians of the 20th century. Were they so successful because of their music? Their appearance? The rise of the “youth culture”? Or because of shrewd management? We will focus both on the Beatles’ music and on the group’s cultural significance. We will read about (and listen to) the Beatles, read their own words, and study the social upheavals of the 1960s in which their music played a part. Assessing the credibility of what we read will be central to our discussions. There will be a number of short papers and a final research project. No previous background in music is required; however, students choosing this seminar should already be familiar with the Beatles and their music.
3384 FYSM-183-01 Natns,Natnalis&Religious Impul 1.00 SEM Harrington,Thomas S. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  In this course we will examine the interplay between contemporary movements of national identity and the long-standing human tendency to seek comfort and transcendence through religious practices—understood here in the original etymological sense of that which binds us together. As part of our exploration we will look first at how, in numerous places around the globe, the rise of modern forms of nationalism coincided with the demise of religious primacy within society. We will then examine some of the ways (e.g., pilgrimages, liturgies, and the adoration of icons) in which the religious spirit or impulse continues to manifest itself in the daily life of many, if not most, of the national and/or nationalist collectives in the world.
3415 FYSM-185-01 Hard-Boiled Detective Fiction 1.00 SEM Butos,Cynthia L. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Participants will study novels, such as Raymond Chandler’s The Big Sleep, Dashiell Hammett’s The Maltese Falcon, Chester Himes’ A Rage in Harlem, Sara Paretsky’s Bitter Medicine, and Sue Grafton’s A Is for Alibi. We will consider how these texts reflect and question the social values and cultural conflicts of their times, especially the complexities of race, class, and gender. We will also view several film adaptations to see how a different medium transforms these texts. Writing requirements include informal reflection papers for each reading, three short papers and a longer researched argument.
3379 FYSM-190-01 Food&Pwr in Americas:1492-1888 1.00 SEM Wickman,Thomas M. MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  This course examines the history of food in the Americas, from Columbus’ first landfall in the New World to the abolition of slavery in Brazil in 1888. Over four centuries, the hemisphere underwent multiple revolutions in the way people grew, exchanged, cooked, and ate food. As a result of such historical changes, some people accrued religious, political, economic, and physical power, while other people lost power, suffering hunger, malnutrition, enslavement, discrimination, and other injustices. Among the foods to be studied (and sampled) will be maize, potatoes, cacao, coffee, cane sugar, wheat, rice, beef, venison, and cod. Students will read scholarship on food from various disciplines and write about food in historical documents such as paintings, photographs, travel narratives, autobiographies, and cookbooks.
3367 FYSM-195-01 Is Homer History? 1.00 SEM Reger,Gary MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Homer’s Iliad tells the tale of the anger of Achilles in the course of the Trojan War. It’s a compelling story that has captivated readers for over 2700 years. But how should we understand this story? Is it history, as some have thought? Does it provide insight into the Mycenaean world? Or is it “just a story?” Or something more complicated and ambiguous? In this seminar we will scrutinize the text and explore the many ways readers have understood it, including ways the story has been used in modern-day psychotherapy, fiction, and film.
3392 FYSM-199-01 Networks, Historical & Contemp 1.00 SEM Regan-Lefebvre,Jennifer M. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  We use the word “network” to describe the structure of human connections in contemporary life. This course explores the way that the network has been a useful concept for historians, too. Students will read and learn to think about networks both in an abstract sense and through a range of historical examples. They will then get hands-on experience of using historical sources, working with archival material of business and personal networks from the nineteenth century. In parallel with our historical discussions, students will work closely with Career Development to think critically about networking and to start constructing their own professional networks.
3368 FYSM-204-01 Curiosity&Madness in Engl Lit 1.00 SEM Benedict,Barbara M. MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  What do the stories of Pandora, Eve, and Alice in Wonderland have in common? Is curiosity a virtue or a sin in Western culture? When is someone "curious" and when is someone considered "a curiosity"? When does curiosity turn into "madness," however we define that? In this seminar, we will read English literature from all genres and all centuries (as well as seeing some films) about "curious" and "mad" people in order to explore what makes people curious and how the category of curiosity relates to madness. Readings will include Gothic mysteries and detective fictions; a play by Shakespeare; poetry and essays by writers from Francis Bacon to Stevie Smith; and theory by Michel Foucault and others.
3369 FYSM-209-01 Tech,Secular&Disappear of Trad 1.00 SEM van Ginhoven Rey,Christopher TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  The foundations of European civilization were dramatically altered in the century leading from the Industrial Revolution to World War II. How did writers, painters, and philosophers testify to these transformations? This seminar is structured around a sequence of encounters with works of art that raise crucial questions about three fundamental developments: the emergence of technological civilization, secularization, and the disappearance of tradition. What is the relation between these phenomena and how do they each reverberate in the world we live in today? Works by Holderlin, Nietzsche, Kafka, Heidegger, Duchamp, Eliot, Beckett, Weil, Cernuda, Ortega y Gasset, and Borges.
3370 FYSM-212-01 Introduction to Hip-Hop 1.00 SEM Markle,Seth M. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  This course focuses on a particular period that was crucial to hip-hop's cultural growth and development. Nostalgically referred to as the "Golden Era", the years between1985 and 1994 witnessed a creative explosion in artistic production and political agency. In exploring themes of race, class, gender and youth identity formation, one question this course will seek to answer is: How has hip-hop served as medium for social change? Using an interdisciplinary approach grounded in the historical method, this course encourages students to interrogate hip hop's relationship to issues of poverty, racism, sexism, capitalism and aesthetics.
3382 FYSM-215-01 Mathematical Gems 1.00 SEM Wyshinski,Nancy J. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y FYR4  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  NOTE: Students who place into QLIT 101 are not eligible to enroll in this course.
  In this seminar, we will explore several mathematical topics from number theory, geometry, infinity, fractals and chaos and more. From number theory, we will consider questions such as “How many primes are there?”, “What is the relationship between clocks, bar codes and credit card numbers?” and “Is the set of rational numbers the same size as the set of irrational numbers?” The last question will allow us to further explore infinity. From geometry, we will look at proofs of the Pythagorean Theorem (did you know one of our Presidents created a proof?), investigate patterns, symmetries and tilings. What is the golden ratio and what does that have to do with rectangles and continued fractions? By studying fractals, we will find a connection to fractional dimensions.
3386 FYSM-219-01 Class Struggle 101 1.00 SEM Williams,Johnny Eric MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  The course explores the cultural deification of wealth and those who have wealth. People with immense wealth are presented as leaders or oracles. As a result, people fail to grasp the internal logic of the oligarchic class. The course provides students with knowledge that shatters the self-delusion that if we work hard enough and study hard enough, we too can be wealthy. Students will explore how wealth generates social forces that produce and sustain cultural, economic, and psychological pathologies in arenas in which the super-rich secure their dominance – including family, education, nation and world. Within an interdisciplinary framework, students will learn the theoretical, historical, practical, and political aspects of the cult of the self, which the super-rich perpetuate as natural and good.
3394 FYSM-221-01 The Human Machine 1.00 SEM Palladino,Joseph L. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  The human body is a complex and fascinating machine. Biomedical engineering uses engineering tools, both analytical and experimental, to understand this machine and to improve human health. Biomedical engineers study human physiology in both normal and disease states, and build devices to improve health and function. With roots going back to ancient Egypt, biomedical engineering developed in the 1950s and 60s as a modern discipline and has expanded into the dynamic field it is today. Students in this seminar will study these pillars of biomedical engineering: biomechanics, bioelectronics, biomaterials, biological signal processing and bioimaging. Students will use basic mathematics and physics to ask and answer questions about the human body and physiological function. Writing assignments will guide students through modern biomedical research and applications.
3381 FYSM-224-01 21st Century Art 1.00 SEM Valentino,Erin MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  What does it mean to be an artist in the twenty-first century? How do artists engage and animate this contemporary moment? In this course, we will study artists who work in traditional and new media--from painting to bioengineering. We will look at the ways that artists interpret recent events--prolonged war, ecological challenges, the expansion of the internet, and new economic circumstances. We will also examine the ways that they make such enduring subjects as history, nature, and imagination relevant to the contemporary moment. Readings will come from a variety of critical and literary sources. Course work includes class discussions, imaginative and critical writing and projects, library research, and oral presentations. Field trips and other special events will be required for the course.
3371 FYSM-229-01 Physics in Science Fiction 1.00 SEM Branning,David TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  Science fiction has a long history of presenting speculations on the physical laws of the universe and the consequences of these laws for our lives and our civilization. Many of these speculations have turned out to be correct, others have proved spectacularly wrong, and some are so forward-looking that the verdict may not be known for centuries. We will read stories mostly in the "hard SF" tradition of Tom Godwin's "The Cold Equations" and Poul Anderson's "Tau Zero." Along with classic masters such as Arthur C. Clarke, Isaac Asimov, and Larry Niven, we will explore modern award-winning authors such as Greg Egan, David Marusek, and Ted Chiang. We will discuss how their stories explore scientific concepts, and we will incorporate these concepts into original written works.
3416 FYSM-233-01 Understanding Race 1.00 SEM Wade,Maurice L. WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  This seminar focuses on attempts by philosophers and other philosophically-minded thinkers to plumb the meaning and significance of race. Among the questions that the course will explore are: what is race; what has been/is the significance of race; should race continue to matter to us personally, politically, socially, etc.; is a post-racial society possible; what might a post-racial society be like? Reading assignments will be drawn from both historical and contemporary texts.
3372 FYSM-237-01 Understding&ReversingPrejudice 1.00 SEM Reuman,David A. WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  What are the causes of prejudice and discrimination? Are prejudice and discrimination inevitable? Does prejudice always lead to discrimination? Is discrimination always a result of prejudice? Is the nature of prejudice universal, whether we consider group differences based on social class, race, religion, gender, politics, obesity, age, or any other status characteristic? Do strategies for reducing prejudice and discrimination follow the same principles, whether we are trying to reduce hate crimes or implement affirmative action programs in American institutions of higher education? Questions like these will be addressed in this seminar through use of literature, film, and social science readings, as well as regular in-class debates, discussions, and role-playing exercises.
3432 FYSM-242-01 Youth & the Am Civil Rgts Mvmt 1.00 SEM Spurlock-Evans,Karla J. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y FYR  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Only first-year students are eligible to enroll in this class.
  The seminar will explore the role played by young people in the struggle for racial equality and social justice in America waged during the middle decades of the 20th century. Through contemporaneous and retrospective narratives, documentary footage, and music, we will seek to recover the lesser known and more personal dimensions of history as we examine how social change was made. The seminar will examine collaborations and conflicts that arose among participants in the Movement across lines of race, class, gender, and generation – and the resulting rise of new organizations and new movements: the Black Power Movement, the contemporary Women’s Movement, and movements for economic and social justice arising among previously marginalized groups such as American Indians and Mexican American farmworkers.