COURSE SCHEDULE

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Course Listing for All Departments - Summer 2020
ALL05/19/202008/14/2020
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1015 AMST-298-05 Intro to HipHop Music & Cult 1.00 LEC Conway, Nicholas TR: 6:00PM-9:30PM TBA HUM Q2
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  This course will examine the evolution of hip hop music and culture (Graffiti art, B-boying [break-dancing], DJ-ing, and MC-ing) from its birth in 1970s New York to its global and commercial explosion during the late 1990s. Students learn to think critically about both hip hop culture, and about the historical, commercial, and political contexts in which hip hop culture took, and continues to take, shape. Particular attention is paid to questions of race, masculinity, authenticity, consumption, commodification, globalization, and good, old-fashioned funkiness.
1008 AMST-329-05 Viewing The Wire 1.00 SEM Conway, Nicholas MW: 6:00PM-9:30PM TBA HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with FILM
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  Through analysis and dissection of David Simon's The Wire, this course seeks to equip students with the tools necessary to examine our postmodern society. The Wire seamlessly juxtaposes aesthetics with socio-economic issues, offering up a powerful lens for investigating our surroundings. Whether issues of unregulated free market capitalism, the bureaucracy of our school systems, politics of the media, false notions of equal opportunity, devaluation of human life, or a failed war on drugs, The Wire addresses the complexities of American urban life. Through a socio-political and cultural reading of the five individual seasons, students will be able to explore a multitude of contemporary problems.
1027 AMST-857-05 Novels into Film 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel MW: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA Q1
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with FILM Cross-listing: ENGL-857-05, ENGL-457-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  : In this course we will examine the process of adapting novels into films, using several signature, significant film adaptations of major novels to study various aspects of the process of adaptation. Works will include The Godfather (Puzo novel; Coppola film), The Grapes of Wrath (Steinbeck novel, John Ford film); To Kill a Mockingbird (Harper Lee novel, Robert Mulligan film), and at last one film by Martin Scorsese and a recent adaptation. We will examine the different language of analysis used for literature and film as well as the cultural implications of the films and novels and the process of adaptation itself.
1037 AMST-881-05 Coffee Power and Cultures 1.00 SEM Miller, Karen TR: 6:00PM-9:30PM TBA Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  Coffee has long connected and stratified communities globally and locally. This course will investigate how coffee has played central roles in the formation of power structures, politics, and relations worldwide. We will explore how coffee houses have brewed revolutions, from the American patriots to women suffragists to colonial Singaporeans. Our studies will also focus on early production and trade practices, including slavery and the triangular trade, to more recent developments, such as organic and fair trade coffees. Additional discussions will cover coffee as a status symbol and conspicuous consumption, the bean to cup movement, coffee and gender construction, and the meanings of coffee places, as UNESCO intangible cultural heritage spaces to third spaces. We will hold several class meetings off campus.
1012 BIOL-121-15 Human Health and Nutrition 1.00 SEM Draper, Alison W: 9:00AM-12:00PM
R: 9:00AM-1:00PM
TBA NAT Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: Summer Institute
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  This course will focus on basic human physiology and nutrition related to human health. We will examine organ systems, such as cardiovascular, kidney and liver, and explore how diet influences their function, susceptibility to chronic disease and longevity. We will discuss the standard American diet, other dietary philosophies and diet fads and explore the scientific literature to determine their effects on long term health. Throughout the course, we will explore food through tastings, examination of menus and recipes, dining out and cooking and students will develop personal dietary strategies for good health. All levels of college science background are welcome. Not creditable to the Biology major.
1013 BIOL-216-01 Human Anatomy 1.00 LEC Dunlap, Kent TR: 6:00PM-9:00PM TBA NAT Q1
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C - or better in Biology 140 or Biology 182 or Biology 183, or equivalent college-level introductory biology
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on June 30.
  This course will examine the function, development and evolution of the human form. We will examine the anatomy of the musculoskeletal, sensory, nervous, cardiovascular, osmo-regulatory and reproductive systems. Discussions will also include the anatomical basis of certain clinical conditions and pathologies.
1004 ECON-210-05 Contemporary Micro Issues 1.00 LEC Xhurxhi, Irena MW: 9:30AM-1:00PM TBA SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 39 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  This course covers economic decision-making by individuals, firms and factor markets, and the role of government in designing economic policy and its impact on individuals. Topics include: Price discrimination; cartels, oligopolies, and monopolistic competition; economics of network goods; labor markets; public goods; political economy; economics, ethics and public policy; incentives; stock markets and consumer choice. Some of the questions we will try to answer among others are: Is in-state vs out-of-state tuition an example of price discrimination? Can OPEC nations collude to force up the price of oil? Why do friends so often enjoy the same musical songs? Why is it that the world is running out of so many kinds of fish? Are markets fair?
1005 ECON-218-05 Intro to Stats for Econ 1.00 LEC Xhurxhi, Irena TR: 9:30AM-1:00PM TBA NUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C+ or better in Economics 101 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  As data and computing resources have become increasingly accessible, economics has become more concerned with measurement and estimation of economic phenomena. This course is designed to familiarize students with common statistical methods used in economics. Topics will include the presentation of data, descriptive statistics, probability theory, discrete and continuous distributions, sampling distributions, estimation, and hypothesis testing.
1025 ENGL-457-05 Novels into Film 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel MW: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA Q1
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with FILM Cross-listing: AMST-857-05, ENGL-857-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  : In this course we will examine the process of adapting novels into films, using several signature, significant film adaptations of major novels to study various aspects of the process of adaptation. Works will include The Godfather (Puzo novel; Coppola film), The Grapes of Wrath (Steinbeck novel, John Ford film); To Kill a Mockingbird (Harper Lee novel, Robert Mulligan film), and at last one film by Martin Scorsese and a recent adaptation. We will examine the different language of analysis used for literature and film as well as the cultural implications of the films and novels and the process of adaptation itself.
1026 ENGL-857-05 Novels into Film 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel MW: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA Q1
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with FILM Cross-listing: AMST-857-05, ENGL-457-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  : In this course we will examine the process of adapting novels into films, using several signature, significant film adaptations of major novels to study various aspects of the process of adaptation. Works will include The Godfather (Puzo novel; Coppola film), The Grapes of Wrath (Steinbeck novel, John Ford film); To Kill a Mockingbird (Harper Lee novel, Robert Mulligan film), and at last one film by Martin Scorsese and a recent adaptation. We will examine the different language of analysis used for literature and film as well as the cultural implications of the films and novels and the process of adaptation itself.
1016 ENVS-282-05 Drone Flight School 1.00 LEC Tatem, David TR: 1:30PM-5:00PM TBA Q2
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) or drones have quickly emerged as a new way to explore the world around us. Emerging applications include mapping, photogrammetry, surveying, search and rescue, scientific research, and unmanned cargo delivery to name just a few. In this hands-on course all participants will pilot college owned drones to learn how to fly safely and responsibly to generate maps and 3D models utilizing ArcGIS and photogrammetry software. In addition to learning how to pilot the drones, students will explore the legal issues involved including: privacy and safety; FAA and other federal regulations; state and local laws; and current and future policy implications. The course will provide students with a solid basis for pursuing an FAA remote pilot certificate. Not open to students who have completed ENVS 281.
1002 HIST-272-01 Pacific World 1.00 LEC Alejandrino, Clark MW: 1:30PM-4:30PM TBA GLB2 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on June 30.
  The Pacific Ocean has historically been regarded as a vast and prohibitive void rather than an avenue for integration. Yet over the last five centuries motions of people, commodities, and capital have created important relationships between the diverse societies situated on the "Pacific Rim." This course examines the history of trans-Pacific interactions from 1500 to the present. It takes the ocean itself as the principal framework of analysis in order to bring into focus large-scale processes -- migration, imperial expansion, cross-cultural trade, transfers of technology, cultural and religious exchange, and warfare and diplomacy. This "oceans connect" approach to world history brings these processes into sharp relief while also allowing for attention to the extraordinary diversity of cultures located within and around the Pacific.
1035 INTS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1034 PBPL-430-01 Federal Courts & Public Policy 1.00 SEM Fulco, Adrienne TR: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Q1
  Enrollment limited to 5 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: PBPL-830-01
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on June 30.
  Over the past 30 years, the Supreme Court has been called upon to resolve many important and often controversial public policy questions. The purpose of this course is two-fold: (1) to familiarize students with the role of the federal courts as a policy making institutions; and (2) to carefully analyze actual cases as a means of assessing the scope of the Court's power to shape public policy, especially in areas where there is little political consensus. Readings will include texts and articles on the role of the federal courts and several of the recent court cases.
1018 PBPL-806-01 Methods of Research 1.00 LEC Ellis, Chad MW: 6:00PM-9:00PM TBA Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on August 14.
  This course is intended to empower students to evaluate common forms of research critically, and to give them some experience in conducting research. Through a series of weekly assignments and class projects, students will be introduced to the shaping of research questions; hypothesis testing, writing a research paper, conducting interviews and surveys, giving a professional presentation, and presenting simple tabular data to prove a point. The course does not require an extensive mathematics background. Regular attendance and access to a computer, e-mail, and the Internet are expected.
1021 PBPL-817-05 Education and Immigration 1.00 SEM Chambers, Stefanie MW: 6:00PM-9:30PM TBA SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 9 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: POLS-304-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  This course is designed to introduce students to urban educational policy, with particular focus on the major issues and challenges facing urban and suburban policymakers. After a brief overview of the shape and history of the American school system, we will move toward considering a variety of different perspectives on why it has proven so difficult to improve America's schools. We will examine standards-based, market-driven, professionally-led and networked models of reform, looking at their theories of change, implementation challenges, and the critiques leveled against these approaches. We will examine a variety of recent reform efforts at both the federal and state levels. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which immigration and educational policy interact.
1033 PBPL-830-01 Federal Courts & Public Policy 1.00 SEM Fulco, Adrienne TR: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Q1
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: PBPL-430-01
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on June 30.
  Over the past 30 years, the Supreme Court has been called upon to resolve many important and often controversial public policy questions. The purpose of this course is two-fold: (1) to familiarize students with the role of the federal courts as a policy making institutions; and (2) to carefully analyze actual cases as a means of assessing the scope of the Court's power to shape public policy, especially in areas where there is little political consensus. Readings will include texts and articles on the role of the federal courts and several of the recent court cases.
1019 PBPL-870-05 Polarization and Policy-Making 1.00 SEM Dudas, Mary TR: 6:00PM-9:30PM TBA Q2
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This course is not open to first-year students.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on August 7.
  This course will examine the interaction between policy and polarization. We will first survey the contours and history of polarization in America with a focus on the development of the national political parties. We will then examine the interaction of policy making and polarization at the national and state levels: how does polarization affect policy making at the national and state levels; how does policy affect polarization; why have some states become more polarized than others; and how does that polarization affect policy making at the state level? Finally, we will assess the relationship between policy making and polarization at the national and state levels using the case studies of health care and abortion.
1006 PHIL-250-15 Love, Death, and Twitter 1.00 SEM Ewegen, Shane TR: 1:30PM-5:00PM TBA HUM Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: Summer Institute
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  This course will be an exploration of the many ways in which certain technologies -- including cell phones, the internet (and social media), medical technology, and virtual reality -- have changed our experiences and attitudes toward love and death. By reading the work of a number of philosophers, psychologists, and social scientists, we will gain insight into the impact these technologies have had on our romantic lives and on our understanding of death. This course will entail some off-campus trips (to a sensory deprivation chamber and a virtual-reality arcade) as well as some in-class films.
1009 PHYS-113-05 Ripped Apart! 1.00 STU Mills, Bradley MW: 1:30PM-5:00PM TBA NAT Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  An introduction to the origin, evolution and eventual fate of the universe. Students will be introduced to the most current ideas in cosmology, including the scientific tools used to study these issues. Topics include: the big bang, galaxy formation, observational evidence for dark matter, dark energy, black holes and the origin and fate of the universe itself. The emphasis will on conceptual, as contrasted with mathematical comprehension, making this an excellent opportunity for non-science majors. The class will be taught in an interactive studio format, which emphasizes collaborative problem solving and data analysis. Class time will be divided between lecture and collaborative group exercises and tutorials. Start your summer with a Bang!....Who knows how it will end?
1022 POLS-304-05 Education and Immigration 1.00 SEM Chambers, Stefanie MW: 6:00PM-9:30PM TBA SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: PBPL-817-05
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused.
  NOTE: This course is a Sophomore/Junior Seminar.
  This course is designed to introduce students to urban educational policy, with particular focus on the major issues and challenges facing urban and suburban policymakers. After a brief overview of the shape and history of the American school system, we will move toward considering a variety of different perspectives on why it has proven so difficult to improve America's schools. We will examine standards-based, market-driven, professionally-led and networked models of reform, looking at their theories of change, implementation challenges, and the critiques leveled against these approaches. We will examine a variety of recent reform efforts at both the federal and state levels. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which immigration and educational policy interact.
1010 POLS-326-05 Gender, Politics, and Policy 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie TR: 6:00PM-9:30PM TBA SOC Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, EDUC, WMGS
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused.
  NOTE: This course is a Sophomore/Junior Seminar.
  This course explores the role of gender in American politics. We will begin with an examination of the role of women and men in fighting for and against women's suffrage and the subsequent movement to achieve gender equality. We will consider the many ways men's inclusion and women's exclusion from our political system continues to shape contemporary politics and the distribution of power in American society. We will then examine a series of important questions such as: Why are women less likely than men to run for political office? Is America ready for a woman president? Once in office, do male and female politicians govern differently? The last third of the course examines a series of policy areas with respect to gender.
1030 POLS-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and chairperson are required for enrollment.
1007 SOCL-217-05 Lights, Camera, Society! 1.00 LEC Andersson, Tanetta MW: 1:30PM-5:00PM TBA Q1
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  For some, society is nothing more than a random collection of people all making individual choices in a particular time and location. Yet, this worldview minimizes and overlooks the manifold levels of social life-- social systems, social interaction, and social selves--and our participation in them. Films represent one avenue of illuminating our social world because they mirror back to us key sociological insights of C. Wright Mills, Karl Marx, W.E.B. DuBois, and George Hebert Mead, for example. Students will apply the work of these scholars to films like Wall-e, Norma Rae, Friday Night Lights, and Ex Machina. Class time will involve discussion of films and applied exercises including an extensive role play simulation of Greenwich Village, 1913: Suffrage, Labor, and the New Woman, and a trip to the Tenement Museum in New York City.
1011 URST-101-05 Introduction to Urban Studies 1.00 LEC Lukens, David MW: 9:30AM-1:00PM TBA Q1
  Enrollment limited to 39 Waitlist available: N
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 5-week session scheduled to end on June 23.
  This course provides a general introduction to the interdisciplinary field of urban studies. Using a variety of Western and non-Western cities as illustrative examples, the course aims to give a broad survey and understanding of the distinctive characteristics of urban places. Students will learn definitions, concepts, and theories that are fundamental to the field. Topics covered include the role of planning in shaping cities, the economic structure and function of cities, the evolution of urban culture, community organization and development, gentrification and urban renewal, and urban governance policy.
1003 AHIS-271-15 The Arts of the United States 1.00 LEC Curran, Kathleen MW: 1:30PM-4:30PM TBA ART Q2
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: Summer Institute
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on August 14.
  The course examines key artistic periods of American painting, sculpture, architecture, and decorative arts from the earliest settlements to the return of the twentieth century (ca. 1650-1900). Class lectures are interspersed with field trips to prominent local museums in Hartford, New Haven, and Boston, whose collections relate to class themes. We begin with the colonial period and the rise of portraiture and history painting during the American Revolution. We then focus on genre and landscape painting and explore themes of politics, race, and reverence for the land. The class concludes with the American coming of age at the close of the Civil War and the careers of such artists as Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, John Singer Sargent, and architects H.H. Richardson and McKim, Mead & White.
1014 HISP-103-01 Intensive Beginning Spanish 2.00 LEC Aponte-Aviles, Aidali MTWR: 6:00PM-9:00PM TBA GLB2 Q1
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: This course will take place throughout a 6-week session scheduled to end on June 30.
  Designed to develop a basic ability to read, write, understand, and speak Spanish. Stress will be placed on the acquisition of basic structures, narrating in the present, past, and future, vocabulary acquisition, introduction to the subjunctive. Acquiring familiarity with the geography and culture of the Spanish-speaking world will also be emphasized. Generally for students with minimal or no previous experience studying Spanish. This intensive course combines covers the material from both HISP 101 and 102. Students who have completed HISP 101 or 102, or the equivalent, are not eligible for this course. Any request for exceptions should be addressed to the coordinator of Hispanic Studies