COURSE SCHEDULE

Click here to browse textbooks information at the bookstore's web site.

Browse the course schedule by:
Select a department/program:
Select a level:
Select a term:
Only show courses available to first-year students!

Course Listing for AMERICAN STUDIES - Spring 2020
ALL01/21/202005/08/2020
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2601 AMST-202-01 Early America 1.00 LEC Wickman, Thomas TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM SH - N215 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y
    Cross-listing: HIST-201-01
  This course introduces students to major developments in the political, economic, and social history of North America from the sixteenth to the mid-nineteenth century. We will study indigenous sovereignty, encounters between Europeans and Native Americans, the founding of European colonies, the rise of the Atlantic slave trade, the Seven Years' War, the American Revolution, the spread of human enslavement, the War of 1812, Indian removal policy, U.S. wars with Native nations, westward expansion, the U.S.-Mexican War, abolitionism, and the Civil War. Students will be challenged to imagine American history within Atlantic and global contexts and to comprehend the expansiveness of Native American homelands and the shifting nature of North American borderlands.
1006 AMST-203-01 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Nebolon, Juliet TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM 115V - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first year students. 7 seats reserved for sophomores.
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
2518 AMST-203-02 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Wickman, Thomas MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM SH - N215 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  NOTE: All seats reserved for first year students.
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
2754 AMST-269-01 The 1960s 1.00 LEC Marston, Steven TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM SH - S205 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: HIST-269-01
  The 1960s were watershed years in modern American history. Major areas of U.S. life – politics, foreign policy, culture, race, gender, the economy – experienced monumental shifts that irrevocably altered the nation. This class examines the social, cultural and political history of “the sixties.” Major course themes include: the Cold War; the civil rights movement and Black Power; the Vietnam War and the antiwar movement; the rise of both the New Left and the New Right; the counterculture and cultural change. In addition, the course studies the emergence of second-wave feminism and anti-feminism; the shift from a liberal, Keynesian political-economic order to a conservative, neoliberal era; the international history of the sixties; and the ways that ideas of “the sixties” are used and remembered in contemporary U.S. society, culture and politics.
2483 AMST-282-01 Contemp Native American Lit 1.00 LEC Wyss, Hilary TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM 115V - 106 HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: ENGL-282-01
  Indigenous writers have used fiction, autobiography, and poetry to explore what it means to be a Native person today, whether that is in an urban context or on a reservation. From poetry to historical fiction to dystopian futurist science fiction, Native writers celebrate the resistance and survival that has shaped their lives and communities despite a history of colonization. In this course we will examine a selection of works by Native American writers from across the United States and Canada, using these works to gain insight into the ongoing cultural experience of Native people.
2365 AMST-284-01 Food and American Culture 1.00 LEC Miller, Karen TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM SH - N129 Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  What we eat and how we eat reflect more than basic physical needs, and food has long played influential roles in defining and representing American culture, identities, and nationalism. Our course will begin by examining the history of the Thanksgiving feast and conclude with contemporary movements in organic and farm-to-table eating. As we explore foods' implications for Americanism, gender, class, and age, our topics of study will include defining edibles and non-edibles, immigrant influences, food and technology, American farming, diet fads, school lunches and gardens, hunger in America and food regulations. Our class will work with the nearby Billings Forge community to learn more about food's roles in family life and social reforms, including urban renewal.