COURSE SCHEDULE

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Course Listing for EDUCATIONAL STUDIES - Fall 2019
ALL09/03/201912/18/2019
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1900 EDUC-200-01 Analyzing Schools 1.25 LEC Wong, Jia-Hui Stefanie TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  NOTE: 8 seats are reserved for First Year Students.
  This course introduces the study of schooling within an interdisciplinary framework. Drawing upon sociology, we investigate the resources, structures, and social contexts which influence student opportunities and outcomes in the United States and other countries. Drawing upon psychology, we contrast theories of learning, both in the abstract and in practice. Drawing upon philosophy, we examine competing educational goals and their underlying assumptions regarding human nature, justice, and democracy. In addition, a community learning component, where students observe and participate in nearby K-12 classrooms for three hours per week, will be integrated with course readings and written assignments.
1902 EDUC-200-20 Analyzing Schools 1.25 LAB Wong, Jia-Hui Stefanie TBA TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  NOTE: Each student must reserve a 3-hour block of time in their weekly schedule (anytime between 9am-3pm weekdays) for a community learning placement in a neighborhood Hartford public school, to be arranged by the instructor during the first week of the course.
  NOTE: This is the placement section for the EDUC 200 lecture.
  This course introduces the study of schooling within an interdisciplinary framework. Drawing upon sociology, we investigate the resources, structures, and social contexts which influence student opportunities and outcomes in the United States and other countries. Drawing upon psychology, we contrast theories of learning, both in the abstract and in practice. Drawing upon philosophy, we examine competing educational goals and their underlying assumptions regarding human nature, justice, and democracy. In addition, a community learning component, where students observe and participate in nearby K-12 classrooms for three hours per week, will be integrated with course readings and written assignments.
2652 EDUC-303-01 Sociology of Education 1.00 SEM Douglas, Daniel MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
    Cross-listing: SOCL-303-01
  PR: EDUC200, SOCL101
  This course will examine and apply a sociological perspective to education and schooling. It will examine the ways that formal schooling influences individuals and the ways that culture and social structures affect educational institutions. It begins by surveying texts which look at education and schooling from different viewpoints within sociological theory (including but not limited to: functionalism, rationalization, conflict theory, cultural studies, feminism, and intersectionality).The course then examines contemporary issues affecting US and international educational systems, considers proposed reforms, and discussed alternatives to schooling. In addition to weekly written assignments, students will complete a secondary data analysis project related to an educational topic of their choice.
3172 EDUC-309-01 Race Class & Educ Policy 1.00 SEM Dougherty, Jack TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, PBPL, WMGS
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or permission of instructor.
  How do competing theories explain educational inequality? How do different policies attempt to address it? This class will consider the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the examination of educational inequality. Possible topics include economic and cultural capital, racial/gender/sexual identity formation, desegregation, multiculturalism, detracking, school choice, school-family relationships, and affirmative action. Student groups will expand upon the readings by proposing, implementing, and presenting their research analysis from a community learning project.
1570 EDUC-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1415 EDUC-400-01 Senior Research Seminar 1.00 SEM Douglas, Daniel M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  This seminar is open to senior Educational Studies majors only.
  To fulfill the senior exercise requirement, students carry out an independent research project that builds upon acquired skills and evolving interests. The weekly seminar provides a thematic focus as well as a continuous forum for both support and critical feedback from peers, in preparation for a public presentation of the student’s work at the end of the semester. Each year, the seminar will be organized around a broad theme in educational studies.
1571 EDUC-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
3075 ANTH-301-01 Ethnographic Methods & Writing 1.00 SEM Hussain, Shafqat TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Seats Reserved for Anthropology majors.
  This course will acquaint students with a range of research methods commonly used by anthropologists, and with the types of questions and designs that justify their use. It will describe a subset of methods (individual and group interviewing, and observation) in more detail, and give students practice in their use, analysis, and presentation. Through accompanying readings, the course will expose students to the controversies surrounding the practice of ethnography and the presentation of ethnographic authority. Students will conduct group field research projects during the course, and will develop and write up research proposals for projects they themselves could carry out in a summer or semester. It is recommended that students have already taken an anthropology course.
2517 LAAL-200-01 Action Research Methods Htfd 1.00 LEC Brown, Megan M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, EDUC, HRST, URST
  NOTE: This course will meet at the downtown campus, 10 Constitution Plaza
  NOTE: Apply online at http://action-lab.org
  What is the role of academic research in social change? How can students and community groups collaborate effectively to co-create, implement, and use research projects to solve social problems? In this course, students will study the theories and methods of interdisciplinary action research. Emphasizing ethical collaboration, students will learn research design strategies, methods, tools, and research tools in order to work with community partners to solve pressing problems. Students will learn to use a variety of statistical, geographic, and interview data to answer questions, make recommendations, and tell stories about the issues that are most relevant to Hartford.
2016 PBPL-220-01 Research and Evaluation 1.00 SEM Williamson, Abigail TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 201 or 202, or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: 12 seats reserved for PBPL majors
  Which policy interventions actually work and which fail to meet their goals? Answering this question is essential to improving public and non-profit services and securing further funding for worthwhile projects. This course aims to give students the ability to comprehend policy research and evaluation, as well as the tools to design and conduct basic qualitative and quantitative analysis. Students will apply these practical skills in assignments that ask them to design evaluations or analyze data to assess the effectiveness of policies. Topics will include data analysis using statistical software, but no previous programming experience is necessary.
2141 PBPL-245-01 Title IX: Changing Campus Cult 1.00 SEM Fulco, Adrienne TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  NOTE: 8 seats reserved for PBPL majors.
  This course will explore the legal and policy implications of the new Title IX federal guidelines as they apply to equity in athletics and sexual misconduct on college campuses. During the course of the term we will consider how best to devise and implement effective policies aimed at: increasing equity in college athletics; reducing incidents of sexual misconduct on college campuses; protecting the legal rights of all parties to administrative hearings; ensuring that institutions of higher education are in full compliance with new federal and state mandates. Trinity’s Title IX Coordinator, will periodically join in our class discussions.
3179 PBPL-318-01 Privatization & Public Policy 1.00 SEM Castillo, Elise MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy 201, or permission of instructor
  NOTE: Please contact Prof. Fulco for permission to enroll.
  Governments increasingly contract or partner with the private sector to deliver public goods and services based on the theory that doing so will enhance efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Although policymakers often attend to the economics of privatization, this course explores privatization's political and social dimensions, asking: who gains and who loses when public goods and services are privatized? We will examine theories underlying privatization, evidence of its impact, and debates regarding its costs and benefits. We will study these topics through case studies of K-12 and higher education, infrastructure, housing, criminal justice systems, and other public goods and services. Throughout, we will analyze privatization's impact on equity, democracy, and the common good.
1411 PBPL-323-01 The Legal History of Race Rela 1.00 SEM Stevens, Barry T: 6:45PM-9:25PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Public Policy and Law 123, 201, 202 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: Contact Prof. Fulco for permission.
  This course will examine the interaction between the American social and legal systems in the treatment of race relations. The seminar will analyze major Supreme Court cases on equal rights and race relations with an emphasis on the historical and social contexts in which the decisions were rendered. The Socratic method will be used for many of the classes, placing importance on classroom discussion among the students and the lecturer. The goals of the course are to expose the students to the basis of the legal system and the development of civil rights legislations sharpen legal and critical analysis, improve oral expression, and develop a concise and persuasive writing style.
3015 PBPL-331-01 Immigration/Integration Policy 1.00 SEM Williamson, Abigail TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC Cross-listing: POLS-335-01
  NOTE: Enrollment limited to 15 across PBPL 331 / POLS 335. Students may register for either course. Seven seats reserved for PBPL.
  Critics of immigration argue that a growing foreign-born population endangers economic health, threatens democratic traditions, and undermines cultural unity. Proponents respond that immigration is central to America’s national identity and crucial for prosperity. This course examines popular and scholarly debates over immigration and immigrant adaptation and analyzes the efficacy of U.S. policies aimed at managing this process. Topics include U.S. border security, the increased state and local regulation of immigration, and the DREAM Act, a proposal that would offer certain undocumented youth a path toward legal status. Course assignments will emphasize persuasive writing and communication for a policymaking audience, including memos and briefings.
3169 POLS-335-01 Immigration/Integration Policy 1.00 SEM Williamson, Abigail TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC Cross-listing: PBPL-331-01
  NOTE: Enrollment limited to 15 across PBPL 331 / POLS 335. Students may register for either course. Seven seats reserved for PBPL.
  NOTE: This course counts as a sophomore/junior seminar for Political Science students.
  Critics of immigration argue that a growing foreign-born population endangers economic health, threatens democratic traditions, and undermines cultural unity. Proponents respond that immigration is central to America’s national identity and crucial for prosperity. This course examines popular and scholarly debates over immigration and immigrant adaptation and analyzes the efficacy of U.S. policies aimed at managing this process. Topics include U.S. border security, the increased state and local regulation of immigration, and the DREAM Act, a proposal that would offer certain undocumented youth a path toward legal status. Course assignments will emphasize persuasive writing and communication for a policymaking audience, including memos and briefings.
1431 PSYC-221-01 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LEC Reuman, David MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 36 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
1432 PSYC-221-20 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LAB Senland, Amie M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
1433 PSYC-221-21 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LAB Senland, Amie T: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
1424 PSYC-295-01 Child Development 1.00 LEC Anselmi, Dina MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 49 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  A survey of the biological, cognitive, and social factors that influence the process of development. The course will focus on both theoretical and empirical issues in child development and will include topics such as attachment, emotion regulation, language, cognition, and socialization. The course will highlight how cultural factors, along with biology interact to influence both the process and the outcomes of development. This course includes a community learning component, where students will choose a problem of interest and after talking with community experts, propose a solution to that problem.
1421 PSYC-295-20 Child Development-Lab 0.25 LAB Anselmi, Dina M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 295, or concurrent enrollment.
  An introduction to the major scientific methods of observation, interviews, and experimentation that are used to study developmental questions in the areas of language, memory and concept development, sex-role stereotyping, prosocial development and play. Students will study infant and preschool children at the child care center located on campus. Laboratory can be taken concurrent or subsequent to Psychology 295.
2960 PSYC-324-01 Stereotyping, Prej, and Discr 1.00 SEM Reuman, David WF: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 226.
  This course will focus on classic and contemporary psychological theories and research related to stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. We will analyze these phenomena at the level of individuals, small groups, and institutions, with applications to forms of prejudice and discrimination based on several status characteristics, including race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, and health. Approaches to reducing prejudice and discrimination will be examined and evaluated.
2665 SOCL-214-01 Racism 1.00 LEC Williams, Johnny TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC, GLBLSTDS
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101
  A cross-national comparison of racial and ethnic differences as sources of conflict and inequality within and between societies. We will also consider the role of race and ethnicity as a basis for group and national solidarity. Topics will include the persistence of ethnic and racial loyalties in regard to language, marital choice, and politics; a comparison of social mobility patterns among various ethnic and racial groups; ethnicity and race as reactionary or revolutionary ideologies; and the issues and facts regarding assimilation and pluralism in different societies.
2531 THDN-270-01 Arts in Action: Community 1.00 SEM Pappas, Rebecca TR: 4:30PM-5:45PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, EDUC
  In this course we will examine the way the arts in general and movement in particular both engage a community and are engaged in the community. Using Hartford and the region as a field for our inquiry, we will look at the role the arts play in contributing to the overall health of a community with a particular focus on schools for at-risk youth, correctional institutions, homes for the elderly, specialized magnet schools, after-school programming and performance that utilizes the community as a generative resource. In addition to readings, films, guest speakers and discussions, there will be applied observation and study in the city of Hartford and beyond.