COURSE SCHEDULE

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Course Listing for EDUCATIONAL STUDIES - Spring 2020
ALL01/21/202005/08/2020
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1428 EDUC-200-01 Analyzing Schools 1.25 LEC Douglas, Daniel TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  This course introduces the study of schooling within an interdisciplinary framework. Drawing upon sociology, we investigate the resources, structures, and social contexts which influence student opportunities and outcomes in the United States and other countries. Drawing upon psychology, we contrast theories of learning, both in the abstract and in practice. Drawing upon philosophy, we examine competing educational goals and their underlying assumptions regarding human nature, justice, and democracy. In addition, a community learning component, where students observe and participate in nearby K-12 classrooms for three hours per week, will be integrated with course readings and written assignments.
1429 EDUC-200-20 Analyzing Schools 1.25 LAB Wong, Jia-Hui Stefanie TBA TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  NOTE: This is the placement section for the EDUC 200 lecture.
  This course introduces the study of schooling within an interdisciplinary framework. Drawing upon sociology, we investigate the resources, structures, and social contexts which influence student opportunities and outcomes in the United States and other countries. Drawing upon psychology, we contrast theories of learning, both in the abstract and in practice. Drawing upon philosophy, we examine competing educational goals and their underlying assumptions regarding human nature, justice, and democracy. In addition, a community learning component, where students observe and participate in nearby K-12 classrooms for three hours per week, will be integrated with course readings and written assignments.
1294 EDUC-300-01 Education Reform: Past&Present 1.00 LEC Castillo, Elise M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with PBPL
  Prerequisite: C- or better in EDUC200 or Public Policy and Law major, or permission of instructor
  How do we explain the rise and decline of education reform movements? How do we evaluate their level of “success” from different sources of evidence? Drawing upon primary source materials and historical interpretations, this course examines a broad array of elementary, secondary, and higher education reform movements from the mid-19th century to the present, analyzing social, material, and ideological contexts. This intermediate-level seminar explores a topic common to all branches of educational studies from both theoretical and comparative perspectives.
2596 EDUC-312-01 Education for Justice 1.00 SEM Wong, Jia-Hui Stefanie TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Educational Studies 200 or permission of instructor.
  Schools and educational systems historically and continually are often spaces of exclusion and marginalization, built and maintained to serve the needs and desires of the privileged. But education also holds the possibility of being liberatory and transformative. This course will centrally explore the questions: What does it mean to educate for justice? How can education and/or schooling play a role in creating and working towards freedom, resistance, healing, respect, and sovereignty? We will examine theoretical approaches to critical and liberatory education, as well as how these theories take hold in practice, both in formal and informal schooling settings. Areas of study include multicultural education, culturally relevant pedagogy, critical pedagogy, social justice education, feminist pedagogy, anti-racist teaching, and abolitionist teaching.
1289 EDUC-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1260 EDUC-466-01 Teaching Assistant 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor and director are required for enrollment.
1510 ENVS-286-01 Theory&Appl of Geograph Info S 1.00 LEC Gourley, Jonathan MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  A lecture/lab course that focuses on the theory and application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) using the ESRI ArcGIS software package. ArcGIS is a powerful mapping tool that facilitates the compilation, analysis and presentation of spatial data for a wide variety of disciplines including the natural and social sciences and any other field that uses spatial data. This course will provide students with the fundamental skills needed to design and manage digital databases and map sets so that they may integrate GIS into future courses, research, or careers. Topics include basic and advanced navigation and functionality within the ArcGIS workspace; database management and querying; and methods of data acquisition for GIS project building. Class projects on lab computers will be an integral component of the course and will be tailored to the specific interests and goals of individual students. This course does not meet the natural science distribution requirement.
1545 FORG-280-01 College 1.00 SEM Alcorn, John MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 12 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  An interdisciplinary analysis of selective liberal-arts colleges and kindred universities. Topics include rankings, admissions, diversity, athletics, social life, governance, and payoff. The course has a seminar format. The seminar serves as an introductory case study in formal organizations.
1125 HISP-280-01 Hispanic Hartford 1.00 LEC Aponte-Aviles, Aidali MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221 or 224, or permission of instructor.
  This course seeks to place Trinity students in active and informed dialogue with the Hartford region’s large and diverse set of Spanish-speaking communities. The course will help student recognize and analyze the distinct national histories (e.g. Peruvian, Puerto Rican, Chilean, Honduran, Cuban, Colombian, and Mexican) which have contributed to the Hispanic diaspora in the city and the entire northeastern region of the United States. Students will undertake field projects designed to look at the effects of transnational migration on urban culture, institution-building, and identity formation. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
2449 INTS-235-01 Youth Culture - Muslim World 1.00 SEM Bauer, Janet TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with ANTH, EDUC, MIDDLEAST
  Youth Culture in the Muslim World examines the dynamic world of Muslim youth and the personal, social, and political impact of "coming of age" in a variety of Muslim communities from Asia, the Middle East, and Africa to the Americas. Topics include theories of youth culture, intergenerational conflicts around marriage, gender and sexuality, the re-negotiation of religion and morality, the challenge of accessing education and employment, the globalization of youth cultures, and the often 'revolutionary' struggles over political participation, as conveyed through music, ethnographic texts, fashion, personal memoirs, documentaries, and social media platforms.
2450 INTS-249-01 Immigrants & Refugees 1.00 SEM Bauer, Janet W: 1:15PM-3:50PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with ANTH, CLIC, EDUC, GLBLSTD, PBPL, WMGS
  This course examines the legal, social, political, and religious dimensions of citizenship and belonging with a focus on immigrants and refugees resettling in the United States (and Hartford, in particular). Using ethnographic case studies as well as autobiographical, historical, policy, social media, filmic and literary materials, students will explore topics like American immigration history and law, theories of transnational migration and social inclusion, debates about immigration reform and integration policies, and concepts like superdiversity, cosmopolitanism, and mobility justice in understanding contemporary migration, as it is shaped by forces of nativism, political upheaval, environmental devastation and the global economy. Course typically includes a community learning component.
2010 LAAL-200-01 Action Research Methods Htfd 1.00 LEC Brown, Megan M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA Y NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, EDUC, HRST, URST
  NOTE: This course will meet at the downtown campus, 10 Constitution Plaza
  NOTE: Apply online at http://action-lab.org
  What is the role of academic research in social change? How can students and community groups collaborate effectively to co-create, implement, and use research projects to solve social problems? In this course, students will study the theories and methods of interdisciplinary action research. Emphasizing ethical collaboration, students will learn research design strategies, methods, tools, and research tools in order to work with community partners to solve pressing problems. Students will learn to use a variety of statistical, geographic, and interview data to answer questions, make recommendations, and tell stories about the issues that are most relevant to Hartford.
1122 PSYC-221-01 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LEC Reuman, David MWF: 9:00AM-9:50AM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 36 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
1123 PSYC-221-20 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LAB Senland, Amie M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
1124 PSYC-221-21 Research Design and Analysis 1.25 LAB Senland, Amie T: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  An intensive study of the methods employed in understanding human and animal behavior as well as an introduction to the problems of psychological data evaluation. Some of the topics included will be the roles of observation, description, bias, hypotheses, theory, and non-reactive research. Consideration will also be given to descriptive techniques, including measures of central tendency, variability, and correlation. Problems will deal with hypothesis testing, group comparisons, frequency comparisons, and analysis of variance. Enrollment in lecture and each laboratory limited.
2352 PSYC-246-01 Community Psychology 1.00 LEC Holt, Laura TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with CLIC, EDUC
  This course is not open to first-year students.
  In this course we will explore the major theories and principles of community psychology, a branch of psychology that explores how societal, cultural, and environmental factors impact people's psychological well-being. Topics will include community-based prevention of psychological disorders, health promotion, citizen participation and empowerment, the value of diversity, and the role of social support in buffering stress. We will also examine the goals and methods of community research, with an emphasis on the development, implementation, and evaluation of community-based programs. Given our proximity to numerous vibrant organizations in Hartford, this course requires that students participate in a community learning activity so that they may gain first-hand experience with community collaboration and put their classroom learning into practice. Enrollment limited.
1411 PSYC-255-01 Cognitive Psychology 1.00 LEC Casserly, Elizabeth TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 49 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC, NESC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 101.
  The study of knowledge and how people use it, for example, in recall and recognition, controlling attention and dealing with distractions, solving real-world problems, and spoken or written communication. We will emphasize how each piece of our mental abilities fits together with other skills such as perception and language, along with the ways in which our minds and thoughts can diverge from what we subjectively experience of them.
2353 PSYC-315-01 Development and Culture 1.00 SEM Anselmi, Dina TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 226 or 295
  This seminar will look at current issues in developmental and social psychology including attachment, emotions, cognition, personality, biculturalism, gender, language, socialization and psychopathology from the perspective of cultural psychology. We will focus on the role culture, along with biology play in the outcome of development, as well as influencing our definitions of the process of development. Questions we will address include: How do we define the process of development? Can we integrate development, culture and biology into a coherent model of development? Are there cultural universals? Are current psychological models and methods sufficient to account for the role of culture in development?
2166 PSYC-339-01 Developmental Psychopathology 1.00 SEM Helt, Molly TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA Y WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC, NESC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 261, or Psychology 270 or Psychology 273, or Psychology 295.
  This course examines the overlap between normal and abnormal child development, exploring the relationship between genetics, prenatal influence, temperament, attachment, trauma, and culture to the ultimate expression of child or adult psychopathology. Emphasis is on risk and protective factors, characteristics of disorders first evident in childhood, and ways that caregivers and societies can promote positive outcomes.
2354 PSYC-346-01 Intergroup Relations 1.00 SEM Outten, Robert WF: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 226.
  This course will provide students with a basic understanding of the psychological study of intergroup relations—how people of different groups relate to one another. The area of intergroup relations focuses on the psychological processes involved with how individuals perceive, judge, reason about, feel, and behave toward people in other groups. Social groups can take many forms, ranging from classic social groups (e.g., race, gender, age, ethnicity, religion, class, sexual orientation), not so classic social groups (e.g., weight, mental ability, physical ability, physical attractiveness) to minimal groups. We will examine some of the causes and consequences of intergroup inequality, and explore ways in which the psychological study of intergroup relations can inform attempts at social change.
2644 PSYC-391-01 Psychology of Language 1.00 SEM Fava, Eswen WF: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC, MNOR
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Psychology 255, 256, or 293.
  A survey of the questions asked by researchers working in different areas of psycholinguistics and the methods used to address those questions. We will cover a wide range of issues, from motor control in speech production to online sentence parsing to typical and atypical language acquisition. Focus will be on analytic discussions of readings from textbooks, scholarly reviews, and original research reports. Perspectives from neuroscience, linguistics, and psychology will be considered.
2240 SOCL-201-01 Resrch Meth in Soc Sci 1.00 LEC Douglas, Daniel MW: 11:30AM-12:45PM TBA NUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 210 or permission of instructor.
  An introduction to social sciences inquiry, stressing what is common as well as what is different in the techniques and procedures employed in the different disciplines. The course seeks to develop the student’s skill in designing original research and in evaluating the significance of already published research findings. Topics include: the interdependence of theory and research; ways of formulating research problems and hypotheses; the variety of research designs (introducing the ideas of statistical as well as experimental control); and an overview of the major procedures of instrument construction, measurement, data collection, sampling, and data analysis. Required laboratory sessions offer experience in each step of the research process.
1534 SOCL-246-01 Sociology of Gender 1.00 LEC Spurgas, Alyson TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC, WMGS Cross-listing: WMGS-246-01
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101
  Sex and gender are used as principles of social organization in all known societies. This course surveys research in the sociological study of gender with the goal of providing students with a theoretical grounding for analyzing gender from a sociological perspective. We will explore how our lives and the world around us are shaped by gender and how gender has been constructed over time. We will further examine how sociological research on gender helps us to understand power and inequality at various levels – institutional, organizational, and interactional—by examining various topics such as gender socialization, reproduction, education, work, and violence. We will also pay attention to how gender reinforces and builds upon other areas of inequality such as social class, race, ethnicity, and age.
2399 SOCL-351-01 Society State & Power 1.00 LEC Williams, Johnny MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Sociology 101
  This course examines the sources of power and influence in Western nations. Power flows to people who command a legal, political, or institutional monopoly over valued human resources. We will examine the development of these monopolies, the organizations that perpetuate these monopolies, and the consequences that these monopolies have for our personal and political lives as well as for notions of democracy, solidarity, and freedom. In this respect, we will focus much of our attention on the institutions of state and economy in U.S. society and evaluate the different theoretical perspectives that explain how these institutions confer power on some and deny that power to others. Specific topics include power struggles around the right to representation, for control in the workplace, against racism and discrimination, and over policies to aid the poor.
2639 WMGS-246-01 Sociology of Gender 1.00 LEC Spurgas, Alyson TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC Cross-listing: SOCL-246-01
  Sex and gender are used as principles of social organization in all known societies. This course surveys research in the sociological study of gender with the goal of providing students with a theoretical grounding for analyzing gender from a sociological perspective. We will explore how our lives and the world around us are shaped by gender and how gender has been constructed over time. We will further examine how sociological research on gender helps us to understand power and inequality at various levels – institutional, organizational, and interactional—by examining various topics such as gender socialization, reproduction, education, work, and violence. We will also pay attention to how gender reinforces and builds upon other areas of inequality such as social class, race, ethnicity, and age.