COURSE SCHEDULE

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Course Listing for AMERICAN STUDIES - Spring 2019
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2491 AMST-202-01 Early America 1.00 LEC Wickman, Thomas TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 10 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: HIST-201-01
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for American Studies majors
  This course introduces students to major developments in the political, economic, and social history of North America from the sixteenth to the mid-nineteenth century. We will study indigenous sovereignty, encounters between Europeans and Native Americans, the founding of European colonies, the rise of the Atlantic slave trade, the Seven Years' War, the American Revolution, the spread of human enslavement, the War of 1812, Indian removal policy, U.S. wars with Native nations, westward expansion, the U.S.-Mexican War, abolitionism, and the Civil War. Students will be challenged to imagine American history within Atlantic and global contexts and to comprehend the expansiveness of Native American homelands and the shifting nature of North American borderlands.
1006 AMST-203-01 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Wickman, Thomas MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: All seats reserved for first year students.
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
2448 AMST-203-02 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Manevitz, Alexander MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
  View syllabus
1665 AMST-210-01 Doing Culture 1.00 LEC Baldwin, Davarian TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Culture is not something we simply consume, inhabit or even create. Culture is serious business: pun both intended and upended. We have a dynamic relationship with the world around us and in this class we will use culture, both elite and popular, to help bridge the gap between what we do here in the “ivory tower” and how we live out there in the “real world,” hopefully changing both in the process. Here we will not take culture for granted but engage culture as a method, a tool by which to engage, analyze and critique both historical narratives and contemporary events. In this course, street life, advertisements, popular media, and clothing are interrogated as archives of dynamic meaning, arenas of social interaction, acts of personal pleasure, and sites of struggle. We will also explore what happens when a diversity of forces converge at the intersection of commerce and culture. Present day notions of popular culture, and topics such as authenticity and selling out, will be interrogated both socially and historically.
2450 AMST-254-01 Invisible Man & Black Mod Expr 1.00 LEC Baldwin, Davarian TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with ENGL
  This class interrogates the text and contexts of Ralph Ellison’s iconic novel Invisible Man. Specifically, bringing historical and cultural analysis to bear on a single work of fiction, this course surveys key themes in the Black modern experience from 1899 to 1950 including migration, urbanization, the black modern aesthetic, black radicalism, and black nationalism. Ultimately, Ellison crafted a text of profound social commentary through experimentation with archival evidence and literary form. This class reconstructs the intellectual, aesthetic, and historical production of an American classic.
2573 AMST-264-01 Representations of Autism(s) 1.00 LEC Paulin, Diana TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with ENGL
  With increased visibility and diagnosis rates (1 in 50), autism spectrum disorders constitute a vital part of our nation’s fabric. Because it crosses boundaries, regardless of ethnicity, race, or socioeconomic status and because of its pervasiveness, a critical study of autism representations provides an instructive site for exploring overlapping commonalities and differences in U.S. culture. We will consider how shifting definitions of disability/ability contribute to our understanding of central values/beliefs, such as normalcy, success, humanity, and progress. How do representations and lived experiences frame our society’s understanding of identity, community, citizenship, agency, equality and humanity? Texts include fiction, memoir, film, poetry, print news, periodicals, legal documents, theoretical articles, television, internet media. Some titles include, Rainman and Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime.
1438 AMST-301-01 AmStud Seminar 1.00 SEM Gac, Scott M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This course, required for American Studies majors and ordinarily taken in the sophomore or junior year, examines central methods in the field. Situated on a theme, such as race or popular culture, seminar participants engage in archival, spatial, public humanities, and transnational approaches to the American experience.
2637 AMST-308-01 Mapping American Sexualities 1.00 SEM Corber, Robert W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: WMGS-308-01
  This course examines the emergence of modern forms of sexual personhood in the United States. Starting in the late nineteenth century, it tracks the shift from gender role to object choice as the organizing principle of sexual identities, desires, and practices while paying particular attention to the consolidation of the hetero/homosexual binary. Readings include novels, plays, films, and memoirs, as well as key theoretical texts.
2632 AMST-309-01 Spectacle of Disability 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: Y
    Cross-listing: WMGS-309-01
  NOTE: Students cannot register for the course for credit at both the 300 and 400 levels.
  This course examines how people with disabilities are represented in American literature and culture. Whether it is the exceptional savant who is heralded as a hero because of her "special" abilities or the critically injured person whose disability relegates him to the sidelines of society even though his ability to overcome everyday challenges is applauded from a distance, definitions of disabilities (both generally and explicitly) tell us a great deal about the concept of normalcy and the expectations that we attach to this term. In addition, the various narratives associated with different disabilities and their origins are shaped by other aspects of identity, such as socio-economic class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, and gender. We will look at a variety of mediums including fiction, non-fiction, film, television, and memoirs in order to examine how these representations, along with the material realities of disabled people, frame our society's understanding of disability and the consequences of these formulations. We look at texts and cases such as Million Dollar Baby, the Terry Schiavo case, Born on a Blue Day, Forrest Gump, the American Disabilities Act, the Christopher Reeves story, and Radio.
2636 AMST-318-01 Literacy and Literature 1.00 LEC Hager, Christopher MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with EDUC Cross-listing: ENGL-318-01
  Literature is produced and consumed by literate people. Nothing could be more obvious. But how do the different ways writers and readers become literate influence the ways they write and read? How have writers depicted the process of acquiring literacy and imagined its importance? In this course, we will examine the nature of literacy and the roles texts play in the development of literacy. With a focus on the United States from the 18th century to the 20th, we will study schoolbooks, texts for young readers, and representations of literacy in literary works ranging from slave narratives to novels to films. We also will study theories of literacy from philosophical, cognitive, and educational perspectives. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research intensive.
2490 AMST-331-01 Lit of Native New England 1.00 SEM Wyss, Hilary TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: ENGL-331-01
  Before it was New England, this was Native space. From the Wampanoags to the Mohegans, Narragansetts and Pequots, diverse Algonquian communities imbued their physical space with their own histories, traditions, and literatures. With the arrival of English settlers, Native Americans became active participants in a world deeply invested in writing and written traditions, and they marked their presence through English colonial written forms while maintaining a longstanding commitment to their own communities and lifeways. In this course we will explore the great variety of writing by and about Native Americans in this region: we will look at the long tradition of Native American literary presence in New England, from English language texts to other forms of cultural expression. The course is research intensive. Note: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900.
2492 AMST-344-01 America's Most Wanted 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: HIST-344-01
  Americans are fascinated by crime. We read detective fiction, watch police dramas, and hold murder mystery dinners. When the crimes are real, we debate guilt or innocence, punishment or rehabilitation, death penalty or life in prison at our dinner tables. Why this fascination, and what does it tell us about our culture and our concerns? In this course we examine several actual crimes and try to understand what made these crimes, and not others, so riveting. What drew us in? What kept us there? Along the way we will also discuss changing police and penal practices, how attitudes about race, class, religion, and gender play into public fixations on particular crimes, and how and why those attitudes shifted over time.
2740 AMST-344-02 America's Most Wanted 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl M: 6:30PM-9:15PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: HIST-344-02
  Americans are fascinated by crime. We read detective fiction, watch police dramas, and hold murder mystery dinners. When the crimes are real, we debate guilt or innocence, punishment or rehabilitation, death penalty or life in prison at our dinner tables. Why this fascination, and what does it tell us about our culture and our concerns? In this course we examine several actual crimes and try to understand what made these crimes, and not others, so riveting. What drew us in? What kept us there? Along the way we will also discuss changing police and penal practices, how attitudes about race, class, religion, and gender play into public fixations on particular crimes, and how and why those attitudes shifted over time.
2449 AMST-354-01 US Civil War/Reconstruction 1.00 SEM Manevitz, Alexander M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with HIST
  As much as the American Civil War was a culmination of centuries of history, it was also a moment of fundamental rupture, transformation, and opportunity. The war, reconstruction, and their reverberations shook the whole nation. At the center of this tumultuous time was the destruction of slavery-on which the nation had been built-and the reconstruction of freedom, labor, and capital across the country. This course will highlight the social, political, economic, and cultural forces that shaped the epoch and changed the nation. Some of the issues we will investigate include: the causes and effects of the American Civil War, slavery, emancipation and freedom, race, racism and racial violence, gender and the role of women in the war and its aftermath, and historical memory.
  View syllabus
1199 AMST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1007 AMST-402-01 Senior Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE:
  Students undertake projects on American studies topics of their own choosing. The projects will be supervised by a faculty member in an American studies-related field. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the project adviser and director, are required for enrollment.
2650 AMST-406-01 Slavery and Trinity 1.00 SEM Manevitz, Alexander W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with HIST Cross-listing: AMST-806-01
  Prerequisite: 200 level course in American Studies or History.
  How long do the reverberations of slavery last, and how far do they travel? While debates on the memory and legacy of slavery take the national stage, colleges and universities are reckoning with how their own histories of slavery and exploitation may have shaped their pasts and presents. It is Trinity's turn for an honest accounting. Recent scholarship emphasizes slavery's many facets and its far-reaching tendrils. In this course, students will discover Trinity's and Hartford's place in slavery's vast social, cultural, economic, and political networks. Combining archival research and public humanities, we will create projects and archives commemorating Trinity's past, which our community will be able to use as we plot a course for a more equitable future. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
  View syllabus
2649 AMST-410-01 A Queer Lens and Migrants 1.00 SEM Hanna, Karen T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with WMGS Cross-listing: AMST-810-01
  This course illuminates the ways the U.S. nation state is organized to promote traditional hetero-normative family and citizenship structures that inform narratives of American exceptionalism and sexuality. How have the "normative" and "queer" emerged and changed during the 20th and 21st centuries? How have processes of globalization and empire building impacted the lives of queer migrants, producing new experiences and understandings of gender and sexuality? Students will explore the material realities of LGBTQ immigrant communities of color in the United States and how they, as Amy Villarejo puts it, "antagonize and/or conspire with normative investments of nation-states and capital." This course meets the Transnational method requirement.
2613 AMST-417-01 U.S.-Mexico Border 1.00 SEM Soto, Gabriella M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-817-01
  This course explores the social and political history of the U.S.-Mexico border divide, from the evolution of border policing, justifications for sealing the border, and the borderlands' material particularities in contrast to the imagined border. It discusses the expanding "borderization" of the United States. How has border security policy become an extension of U.S. sovereignty, and what is the role of such sovereignty in a globalizing world? Finally, we will talk about what it means to clandestinely cross the border, the construction of race connected to the experience of border crossing, and how the border becomes embodied in those who traverse it. We will read primary policy documents and academic and literary sources that tell multi-dimensional stories of the border as place, idea, and experience. This course meets the Spatial method requirement.
1462 AMST-425-01 Museums,Vis Cult&Crit Theory 1.00 SEM Miller, Karen R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-825-01
  This course aims to examine the issues brought up in key theoretical readings by applying their insights to case studies, particularly cases of museum exhibitions and programs. Issues to be addressed include: reproduction and spectacle; gender and display; ethnicity, 'primitivism,' and race; and sexuality, sexual practice, and censorship. Case studies will vary each year and will range from exhibitions focusing on consumption, to ethnicity and race (such as the Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Pequot Museum), and sexuality (The Museum of Sex; the Robert Mapplethorpe exhibitions). Each class will combine theoretical readings with considerations of museum practice. By the end of the semester, students shall be able to analyze exhibitions using both the tools of postmodern theory and practical observation and history. This course fulfills the public humanities approach. This course meets the Public Humanities method requirement.
2606 AMST-427-01 Sci Fi in the Archives 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-827-01, ENGL-827-01
  NOTE: If you are interested in registering for this course, please contact Professor Mrozowski for a PIN.
  With the aid of the Loftus E. Becker collection in the Watkinson, this course will explore science fiction as an essential map of our post-war American empire. Fueled by dystopian and utopian impulses, artists like Ursula K. Le Guin and Ted Chiang evolved the genre from technological triumphalism into a devastating critique of a culture invested in weapons of mass destruction, alienating digitalization, and environmental collapse. While we read canonical works of post-1945 American science fiction for their aesthetic elements and ideological functions, we'll also map the genre's tangled publishing history and material traces via archival work at the Watkinson. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
2700 AMST-450-01 Race and Incarceration 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 6 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-850-01, HIST-350-01
  #BlackLivesMatter has brought the intersection of race and the criminal justice system into public conversation, but race has been intertwined with imprisonment since American colonization. This course begins with the ways slavery and African Americans were policed by the state, and the history of American prisons. After the Civil War, freed black men and women sought equal rights and opportunities. In response, the justice system shifted to accommodate new forms of racial suppression. The course then considers civil rights activists' experiences with prisons, the War on Drugs' racial agenda, and Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow, which argued that the "prison-industrial complex" is the newest form of racial control. The course ends with current practices of, and challenges to, the criminal justice system. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
1200 AMST-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1201 AMST-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
1162 AMST-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director, are required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2651 AMST-806-01 Slavery and Trinity 1.00 SEM Manevitz, Alexander W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-406-01
  How long do the reverberations of slavery last, and how far do they travel? While debates on the memory and legacy of slavery take the national stage, colleges and universities are reckoning with how their own histories of slavery and exploitation may have shaped their pasts and presents. It is Trinity's turn for an honest accounting. Recent scholarship emphasizes slavery's many facets and its far-reaching tendrils. In this course, students will discover Trinity's and Hartford's place in slavery's vast social, cultural, economic, and political networks. Combining archival research and public humanities, we will create projects and archives commemorating Trinity's past, which our community will be able to use as we plot a course for a more equitable future. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
  View syllabus
2652 AMST-810-01 A Queer Lens and Migrants 1.00 SEM Hanna, Karen T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with WMGS Cross-listing: AMST-410-01
  This course illuminates the ways the U.S. nation state is organized to promote traditional hetero-normative family and citizenship structures that inform narratives of American exceptionalism and sexuality. How have the "normative" and "queer" emerged and changed during the 20th and 21st centuries? How have processes of globalization and empire building impacted the lives of queer migrants, producing new experiences and understandings of gender and sexuality? Students will explore the material realities of LGBTQ immigrant communities of color in the United States and how they, as Amy Villarejo puts it, "antagonize and/or conspire with normative investments of nation-states and capital." This course meets the Transnational method requirement.
2614 AMST-817-01 U.S.-Mexico Border 1.00 SEM Soto, Gabriella M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-417-01
  This course explores the social and political history of the U.S.-Mexico border divide, from the evolution of border policing, justifications for sealing the border, and the borderlands' material particularities in contrast to the imagined border. It discusses the expanding "borderization" of the United States. How has border security policy become an extension of U.S. sovereignty, and what is the role of such sovereignty in a globalizing world? Finally, we will talk about what it means to clandestinely cross the border, the construction of race connected to the experience of border crossing, and how the border becomes embodied in those who traverse it. We will read primary policy documents and academic and literary sources that tell multi-dimensional stories of the border as place, idea, and experience. This course meets the Spatial method requirement.
1461 AMST-825-01 Museums,Vis Cult&Crit Theory 1.00 SEM Miller, Karen R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-425-01
  This course aims to examine the issues brought up in key theoretical readings by applying their insights to case studies, particularly cases of museum exhibitions and programs. Issues to be addressed include: reproduction and spectacle; gender and display; ethnicity, 'primitivism,' and race; and sexuality, sexual practice, and censorship. Case studies will vary each year and will range from exhibitions focusing on consumption, to ethnicity and race (such as the Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Pequot Museum), and sexuality (The Museum of Sex; the Robert Mapplethorpe exhibitions). Each class will combine theoretical readings with considerations of museum practice. By the end of the semester, students shall be able to analyze exhibitions using both the tools of postmodern theory and practical observation and history. This course fulfills the public humanities approach. This course meets the Public Humanities method requirement.
2643 AMST-827-01 Sci Fi in the Archives 1.00 SEM Mrozowski, Daniel T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: ENGL-827-01, AMST-427-01
  NOTE: If you are interested in registering for this course, please contact Professor Mrozowski for a PIN.
  With the aid of the Loftus E. Becker collection in the Watkinson, this course will explore science fiction as an essential map of our post-war American empire. Fueled by dystopian and utopian impulses, artists like Ursula K. Le Guin and Ted Chiang evolved the genre from technological triumphalism into a devastating critique of a culture invested in weapons of mass destruction, alienating digitalization, and environmental collapse. While we read canonical works of post-1945 American science fiction for their aesthetic elements and ideological functions, we'll also map the genre's tangled publishing history and material traces via archival work at the Watkinson. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
2515 AMST-850-01 Race and Incarceration 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 3 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-450-01, HIST-350-01
  #BlackLivesMatter has brought the intersection of race and the criminal justice system into public conversation, but race has been intertwined with imprisonment since American colonization. This course begins with the ways slavery and African Americans were policed by the state, and the history of American prisons. After the Civil War, freed black men and women sought equal rights and opportunities. In response, the justice system shifted to accommodate new forms of racial suppression. The course then considers civil rights activists' experiences with prisons, the War on Drugs' racial agenda, and Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow, which argued that the "prison-industrial complex" is the newest form of racial control. The course ends with current practices of, and challenges to, the criminal justice system. This course meets the Archival method requirement.
1316 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
1317 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1177 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1178 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
1180 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
1288 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
2707 MUSC-218-01 American Popular Music 1.00 LEC Woldu, Gail TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 40 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  A broad survey of popular music in the United States from the late 19th century to the present. We will explore blackface minstrelsy, the music of Tin Pan Alley, ragtime and big band jazz, early blues and country music, post-war pop singers, the evolution of rock and roll, rhythm and blues and soul, folk music, alternative music, hip-hop, and MTV and the popular mainstream. Themes of music and identity, multi- cultural sources, the business of music, and the influence of technology will be followed throughout the course. No previous background in music is required. Also listed in American Studies.