COURSE SCHEDULE

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Course Listing for AMERICAN STUDIES - Spring 2019
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
2491 AMST-202-01 Early America 1.00 LEC Wickman, Thomas TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: HIST-201-01
  This course introduces students to major developments in the political, economic, and social history of North America from the sixteenth to the mid-nineteenth century. We will study indigenous sovereignty, encounters between Europeans and Native Americans, the founding of European colonies, the rise of the Atlantic slave trade, the Seven Years' War, the American Revolution, the spread of human enslavement, the War of 1812, Indian removal policy, U.S. wars with Native nations, westward expansion, the U.S.-Mexican War, abolitionism, and the Civil War. Students will be challenged to imagine American history within Atlantic and global contexts and to comprehend the expansiveness of Native American homelands and the shifting nature of North American borderlands.
1006 AMST-203-01 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Wickman, Thomas MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: All seats reserved for first year students.
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
2448 AMST-203-02 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Manevitz, Alexander MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
1665 AMST-210-01 Doing Culture 1.00 LEC Baldwin, Davarian TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Culture is not something we simply consume, inhabit or even create. Culture is serious business: pun both intended and upended. We have a dynamic relationship with the world around us and in this class we will use culture, both elite and popular, to help bridge the gap between what we do here in the “ivory tower” and how we live out there in the “real world,” hopefully changing both in the process. Here we will not take culture for granted but engage culture as a method, a tool by which to engage, analyze and critique both historical narratives and contemporary events. In this course, street life, advertisements, popular media, and clothing are interrogated as archives of dynamic meaning, arenas of social interaction, acts of personal pleasure, and sites of struggle. We will also explore what happens when a diversity of forces converge at the intersection of commerce and culture. Present day notions of popular culture, and topics such as authenticity and selling out, will be interrogated both socially and historically.
2450 AMST-254-01 Invisible Man & Black Mod Expr 1.00 LEC Baldwin, Davarian TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with ENGL
  This class interrogates the text and contexts of Ralph Ellison’s iconic novel Invisible Man. Specifically, bringing historical and cultural analysis to bear on a single work of fiction, this course surveys key themes in the Black modern experience from 1899 to 1950 including migration, urbanization, the black modern aesthetic, black radicalism, and black nationalism. Ultimately, Ellison crafted a text of profound social commentary through experimentation with archival evidence and literary form. This class reconstructs the intellectual, aesthetic, and historical production of an American classic.
1438 AMST-301-01 Jr. Sem.: American Texts 1.00 SEM Gac, Scott M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in American Studies 203 or AMST 210 or concurrent enrollment.
  This course, required for the American studies major and ordinarily taken in the fall of the junior year, examines central texts in American history and culture. Through intensive discussion and writing, the class will explore the contexts of these works as well as the works themselves, paying particular attention to the interrelated issues of race, class, gender, and other similarly pivotal social constructs. Course is open only to American studies majors.
1667 AMST-326-01 Representation of Miscegenatn 1.00 LEC Paulin, Diana TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with WMGS
  The course examines the notion of miscegenation (interracial relations), including how the term was coined and defined. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we will consider the different and conflicting ways that interracial relations have been represented, historically and contemporaneously, as well as the implications of those varied representations. Examining both primary and secondary texts, including fiction, film, legal cases, historical criticism, and drama, we will explore how instances of interracial contact both threaten and expand formulations of race and “Americanness” in the U.S. and beyond. How is miscegenation emblematic of other issues invoked, such as gender, nation, and sexuality? How do enactments of interracial contact complicate the subjects that they “stage”?
2490 AMST-331-01 Lit of Native New England 1.00 SEM Wyss, Hilary TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: ENGL-331-01
  Before it was New England, this was Native space. From the Wampanoags to the Mohegans, Narragansetts and Pequots, diverse Algonquian communities imbued their physical space with their own histories, traditions, and literatures. With the arrival of English settlers, Native Americans became active participants in a world deeply invested in writing and written traditions, and they marked their presence through English colonial written forms while maintaining a longstanding commitment to their own communities and lifeways. In this course we will explore the great variety of writing by and about Native Americans in this region: we will look at the long tradition of Native American literary presence in New England, from English language texts to other forms of cultural expression. The course is research intensive.
2492 AMST-344-01 America's Most Wanted 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: HIST-344-01
  Americans are fascinated by crime. We read detective fiction, watch police dramas, and hold murder mystery dinners. When the crimes are real, we debate guilt or innocence, punishment or rehabilitation, death penalty or life in prison at our dinner tables. Why this fascination, and what does it tell us about our culture and our concerns? In this course we examine several actual crimes and try to understand what made these crimes, and not others, so riveting. What drew us in? What kept us there? Along the way we will also discuss changing police and penal practices, how attitudes about race, class, religion, and gender play into public fixations on particular crimes, and how and why those attitudes shifted over time.
2467 AMST-350-01 Race and Incarceration 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 4 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-850-01, HIST-350-01
  #BlackLivesMatter has brought the intersection of race and the criminal justice system into public conversation, but race has been intertwined with imprisonment since American colonization. This course begins with the ways slavery and African Americans were policed by the state, and the history of American prisons. After the Civil War, freed black men and women sought equal rights and opportunities. In response, the justice system shifted to accommodate new forms of racial suppression. The course then considers civil rights activists' experiences with prisons, the War on Drugs' racial agenda, and Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow, which argued that the "prison-industrial complex" is the newest form of racial control. The course ends with current practices of, and challenges to, the criminal justice system.
2449 AMST-354-01 US Civil War/Reconstruction 1.00 SEM Manevitz, Alexander M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  As much as the American Civil War was a culmination of centuries of history, it was also a moment of fundamental rupture, transformation, and opportunity. The war, reconstruction, and their reverberations shook the whole nation. At the center of this tumultuous time was the destruction of slavery-on which the nation had been built-and the reconstruction of freedom, labor, and capital across the country. This course will highlight the social, political, economic, and cultural forces that shaped the epoch and changed the nation. Some of the issues we will investigate include: the causes and effects of the American Civil War, slavery, emancipation and freedom, race, racism and racial violence, gender and the role of women in the war and its aftermath, and historical memory.
1199 AMST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1007 AMST-402-01 Senior Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE:
  Students undertake projects on American studies topics of their own choosing. The projects will be supervised by a faculty member in an American studies-related field. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the project adviser and director, are required for enrollment.
2501 AMST-409-01 SrSem: Spectacle of Disability 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-809-01
  This course examines how people with disabilities are represented in American literature and culture. Whether it is the exceptional savant who is heralded as a hero because of her "special" abilities or the critically injured person whose disability relegates him to the sidelines of society even though his ability to overcome everyday challenges is applauded from a distance, definitions of disabilities (both generally and explicitly) tell us a great deal about the concept of normalcy and the expectations that we attach to this term. In addition, the various narratives associated with different disabilities and their origins are shaped by other aspects of identity, such as socio-economic class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, and gender. We will look at a variety of mediums including fiction, non-fiction, film, television, and memoirs in order to examine how these representations, along with the material realities of disabled people, frame our society's understanding of disability and the consequences of these formulations. We look at texts and cases such as Million Dollar Baby, the Terry Schiavo case, Born on a Blue Day, Forrest Gump, the American Disabilities Act, the Christopher Reeves story, and Radio.
2452 AMST-409-01 American Empire 1.00 SEM Hanna, Karen T: 6:30AM-9:10AM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with INTS
  Thomas Jefferson once boldly described the United States as an “empire of liberty.” But whether or not America has ever taken on the identity, ever functioned, as an empire has been one of the most hotly debated topics of our current global times. In this senior seminar we want to take both a historical and contemporary look at what happens when the foreign policy of the United States converges with the general practices of military engagement, occupation, nation-building, commercial market control, and/or annexation of “foreign lands.” Do such foreign relations constitute an empire? In this course we will examine a number of critical moments including the internal U.S. expansion into native American and Mexican lands, “Manifest Destiny” projects in the turn-of-the-twentieth century Caribbean and Asian Pacific, Marshall Plan policies in Cold War Europe, and “War on Terror” initiatives in the present day Middle East. What have been the aspirations of U.S. foreign policy, what have been the consequences, how do they affect the policies and practices “back home.” Have any of these experiences constituted an American Empire?
1669 AMST-412-01 Popular Narratives of US Hist 1.00 SEM Manevitz, Alexander T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with HIST
  History surrounds us in popular culture—from hit Broadway musicals like Hamilton and video games like the Assassin’s Creed series today to the earliest American novels. Though some have dismissed these media as “non-scholarly,” they are the main source of history for many who might not be interested in a traditional scholarly monograph and should be taken seriously. We will spend the semester learning how to analyze the unexpected history presented through these methods, and investigating the possibilities and pitfalls of communicating American history in these different forms. In conversation with practitioners of narrative, experimental, and popular history, students will create a final project of their own design that pushes on the boundaries of how we communicate history and how we define our audience.
1462 AMST-425-01 Museums,Vis Cult&Crit Theory 1.00 SEM Miller, Karen R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-825-01
  This course aims to examine the issues brought up in key theoretical readings by applying their insights to case studies, particularly cases of museum exhibitions and programs. Issues to be addressed include: reproduction and spectacle; gender and display; ethnicity, 'primitivism,' and race; and sexuality, sexual practice, and censorship. Case studies will vary each year and will range from exhibitions focusing on consumption, to ethnicity and race (such as the Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Pequot Museum), and sexuality (The Museum of Sex; the Robert Mapplethorpe exhibitions). Each class will combine theoretical readings with considerations of museum practice. By the end of the semester, students shall be able to analyze exhibitions using both the tools of postmodern theory and practical observation and history. This course fulfills the public humanities approach.
1200 AMST-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1201 AMST-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
1162 AMST-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director, are required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2502 AMST-809-01 SrSem: Spectacle of Disability 1.00 SEM Paulin, Diana T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-409-01
  This course examines how people with disabilities are represented in American literature and culture. Whether it is the exceptional savant who is heralded as a hero because of her "special" abilities or the critically injured person whose disability relegates him to the sidelines of society even though his ability to overcome everyday challenges is applauded from a distance, definitions of disabilities (both generally and explicitly) tell us a great deal about the concept of normalcy and the expectations that we attach to this term. In addition, the various narratives associated with different disabilities and their origins are shaped by other aspects of identity, such as socio-economic class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, and gender. We will look at a variety of mediums including fiction, non-fiction, film, television, and memoirs in order to examine how these representations, along with the material realities of disabled people, frame our society's understanding of disability and the consequences of these formulations. We look at texts and cases such as Million Dollar Baby, the Terry Schiavo case, Born on a Blue Day, Forrest Gump, the American Disabilities Act, the Christopher Reeves story, and Radio.
2541 AMST-819-01 Digital World of NE Artifacts 1.00 SEM Soto, Gabriella R: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This seminar offers students engagement in primary research in historical, literary, and material culture studies and current methods of visualizing data generated by that research to produce new modes of interpretation. Students will develop skills through a series of exercises based on the rich holdings of printed books, ephemera, maps, manuscripts and artifacts related to New England in the 17th -19th centuries in the Watkinson Library. They will work with a clearly defined body of material while studying visualization methodologies currently utilized in digital humanities projects; the final exercise is a portfolio, which will include a process journal, a reflection paper, and a "grant proposal" for a real-world project..
1461 AMST-825-01 Museums,Vis Cult&Crit Theory 1.00 SEM Miller, Karen R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-425-01
  This course aims to examine the issues brought up in key theoretical readings by applying their insights to case studies, particularly cases of museum exhibitions and programs. Issues to be addressed include: reproduction and spectacle; gender and display; ethnicity, 'primitivism,' and race; and sexuality, sexual practice, and censorship. Case studies will vary each year and will range from exhibitions focusing on consumption, to ethnicity and race (such as the Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Pequot Museum), and sexuality (The Museum of Sex; the Robert Mapplethorpe exhibitions). Each class will combine theoretical readings with considerations of museum practice. By the end of the semester, students shall be able to analyze exhibitions using both the tools of postmodern theory and practical observation and history. This course fulfills the public humanities approach.
2515 AMST-850-01 Race and Incarceration 1.00 SEM Greenberg, Cheryl TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-350-01, HIST-350-01
  #BlackLivesMatter has brought the intersection of race and the criminal justice system into public conversation, but race has been intertwined with imprisonment since American colonization. This course begins with the ways slavery and African Americans were policed by the state, and the history of American prisons. After the Civil War, freed black men and women sought equal rights and opportunities. In response, the justice system shifted to accommodate new forms of racial suppression. The course then considers civil rights activists' experiences with prisons, the War on Drugs' racial agenda, and Michelle Alexander's The New Jim Crow, which argued that the "prison-industrial complex" is the newest form of racial control. The course ends with current practices of, and challenges to, the criminal justice system.
1316 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
1317 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1177 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1178 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
1180 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
1288 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff, Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
1310 EDUC-300-01 Education Reform: Past&Present 1.00 LEC Dougherty, Jack M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, PBPL
  Prerequisite: C- or better in EDUC200, or American Studies major or Public Policy and Law major.
  How do we explain the rise and decline of education reform movements? How do we evaluate their level of “success” from different sources of evidence? Drawing upon primary source materials and historical interpretations, this course examines a broad array of elementary, secondary, and higher education reform movements from the mid-19th century to the present, analyzing social, material, and ideological contexts. This intermediate-level seminar explores a topic common to all branches of educational studies from both theoretical and comparative perspectives.
2313 ENGL-104-01 Intro Amer Literature-I 1.00 LEC Wyss, Hilary TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  This course introduces students to American literature before 1865 by surveying a wide range of texts-some very famous, some little-known-written by and about people living in the present-day United States, from the earliest Europeans' arrival in the Americas until the time of the U.S. Civil War. The course will trace political, intellectual, and social developments as they interacted with literary culture. Students will both acquire knowledge of American cultural history and develop skills of literary analysis. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
1538 ENGL-265-01 Intro to Film Studies 1.00 LEC Younger, James MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM
M: 6:30PM-9:10PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 49 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, FILM
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. It is also the gateway course for the literature and film concentration.
  NOTE: Evening meetings of this class are for film screening only.
  This course provides a general introduction to the study of film and focuses on the key terms and concepts used to describe and analyze the film experience. As we put this set of tools and methods in place, we will also explore different modes of film production (fictional narrative, documentary, experimental) and some of the critical issues and debates that have shaped the discipline of film studies (genre, auteurism, film aesthetics, ideology). Note: Evening meetings of this class are for film screenings only. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. It is also the gateway course for the literature and film concentration. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the film studies minor.
2316 ENGL-318-01 Literacy and Literature 1.00 LEC Hager, Christopher MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in English 260 or permission of instructor.
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research intensive.
  Literature is produced and consumed by literate people. Nothing could be more obvious. But how do the different ways writers and readers become literate influence the ways they write and read? How have writers depicted the process of acquiring literacy and imagined its importance? In this course, we will examine the nature of literacy and the roles texts play in the development of literacy. With a focus on the United States from the 18th century to the 20th, we will study schoolbooks, texts for young readers, and representations of literacy in literary works ranging from slave narratives to novels to films. We also will study theories of literacy from philosophical, cognitive, and educational perspectives. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is research intensive.
1136 HISP-280-01 Hispanic Hartford 1.00 LEC Aponte-Aviles, Aidali MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, CLIC, EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221 or 224, or permission of instructor.
  This course seeks to place Trinity students in active and informed dialogue with the Hartford region’s large and diverse set of Spanish-speaking communities. The course will help student recognize and analyze the distinct national histories (e.g. Peruvian, Puerto Rican, Chilean, Honduran, Cuban, Colombian, and Mexican) which have contributed to the Hispanic diaspora in the city and the entire northeastern region of the United States. Students will undertake field projects designed to look at the effects of transnational migration on urban culture, institution-building, and identity formation. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
1732 HIST-215-01 Latin American Cities 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, INTS Cross-listing: URST-215-01
  NOTE: 5 seats reserved for first-year students
  Topics include: urbanism, religion and power in the ancient civilizations of Mexico, Central America and the Andes; colonial-era urbanism, religion, slavery and politics (1520s-1810s); post-colonial nation-building, modernization, Europeanization and early radical politics (1820s-1920s); populist-era industrialization, urban growth, class conflicts, revolutionary politics, and authoritarianism (1930s-1970s); democratization, social movements, and exclusionary and progressive urbanism in the era of neoliberalism and globalization (1980s-present). Throughout the course, we pay particular attention to gender, sexual, racial and ethnic identities, as well as to both popular culture and the fine arts, using examples from Bahia, Buenos Aires, Bogotá, Brasilia, Caracas, Cusco, Havana, Lima, Mexico City, Montevideo, Rio de Janeiro, San Juan de Puerto Rico, São Paulo, and Santiago de Chile.
2282 POLS-102-01 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first year students, 10 seats for sophomores, and 4 seats for juniors who have declared a POLS major. No seniors unless by Instructor Permission.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
2283 POLS-102-02 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Chambers, Stefanie TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: This course is Methodologically Focused
  NOTE: Seats are reserved: 15 First-Year, 15 Sophomore, 5 Political Science Junior No Senior will be allowed to enroll without Permission of the Instructor
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
2421 RELG-286-01 Islam in America 1.00 LEC Koertner, Mareike TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, INTS
  Islam has become the fastest growing and most ethnically diverse religious group in the United States. This course is divided into two parts: the first provides an historical survey of Islam in America, from its discovery to the present; the second part examines contemporary issues of Muslim American communities and their interactions with American society at large. Topics include religious movements among African-American and immigrant groups, educational, cultural and youth initiatives, Sufism, civil rights groups, progressive Muslims, women's and feminist movements, and Islam in popular culture and in the media.
1340 SOCL-241-01 Mass Media & Pop Culture 1.00 LEC Williams, Johnny MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 39 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, GLBLSTDS
  This course examines the integral role mass communication has in social and cultural life. Specifically, it explores how we identify and construct our social identity using media images. This is accomplished by focusing on different types of media content and their effect on individuals and culture, as well as by examining audience response to media content. Other topics covered include the social and economic organization of mass media, development of communication technologies, and sexist and racist stereotypes in the media.
1464 THDN-247-01 Post War American Theater 1.00 SEM Power, Katharine TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, PBPL
  This course offers a survey of prominent plays and choreographies authored by American theater artists during the post-war period (1945-1965). Playwrights such as Arthur Miller, Lorraine Hansberry, and Tennessee Williams, along with selected choreographers, including Martha Graham and Alvin Ailey will be discussed with reference to the House Committee on Unamerican Activities; the popularity of Freudian and Jungian psychoanalysis; the emergence of a civil rights movement; and the social and political forces of "containment" that defined the early years of the Cold War era.
2500 URST-215-01 Latin American Cities 1.00 LEC Figueroa, Luis TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 29 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, INTS Cross-listing: HIST-215-01
  Topics include: urbanism, religion and power in the ancient civilizations of Mexico, Central America and the Andes; colonial-era urbanism, religion, slavery and politics (1520s-1810s); post-colonial nation-building, modernization, Europeanization and early radical politics (1820s-1920s); populist-era industrialization, urban growth, class conflicts, revolutionary politics, and authoritarianism (1930s-1970s); democratization, social movements, and exclusionary and progressive urbanism in the era of neoliberalism and globalization (1980s-present). Throughout the course, we pay particular attention to gender, sexual, racial and ethnic identities, as well as to both popular culture and the fine arts, using examples from Bahia, Buenos Aires, Bogotá, Brasilia, Caracas, Cusco, Havana, Lima, Mexico City, Montevideo, Rio de Janeiro, San Juan de Puerto Rico, São Paulo, and Santiago de Chile.
2275 WMGS-245-01 The Hollywood Musical 1.00 LEC Corber, Robert T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, ENGL, FILM
  Perhaps more than any other genre, the musical epitomized Hollywood’s “golden age.” This course traces the development of the enormously popular genre from its emergence at the beginning of the Great Depression to its decline amid the social upheavals of the 1960s. It pays particular attention to the genre’s queering of masculinity and femininity, as well as its relationship to camp modes of reception. Readings by Jane Feuer, Rick Altman, Richard Dyer, Janet Staiger, and Steven Cohan.
2276 WMGS-308-01 Mapping American Sexualities 1.00 SEM Corber, Robert W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  This course examines the emergence of modern forms of sexual personhood in the United States. Starting in the late nineteenth century, it tracks the shift from gender role to object choice as the organizing principle of sexual identities, desires, and practices while paying particular attention to the consolidation of the hetero/homosexual binary. Readings include novels, plays, films, and memoirs, as well as key theoretical texts.