COURSE SCHEDULE

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Course Listing for AMERICAN STUDIES - Spring 2017
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
4053 AMST-203-01 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Wickman,Thomas M. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first-year students, 7 for sophomores, 2 HMTCA particpants.
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
4967 AMST-203-02 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Heatherton,Christina TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for First-Year students, 7 for Sophomores, and 2 for Juniors
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
4567 AMST-254-01 Invisible Man & Black Mod Expr 1.00 LEC Manevitz,Alexander D. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  This class interrogates the text and contexts of Ralph Ellison’s iconic novel Invisible Man. Specifically, bringing historical and cultural analysis to bear on a single work of fiction, this course surveys key themes in the Black modern experience from 1899 to 1950 including migration, urbanization, the black modern aesthetic, black radicalism, and black nationalism. Ultimately, Ellison crafted a text of profound social commentary through experimentation with archival evidence and literary form. This class reconstructs the intellectual, aesthetic, and historical production of an American classic.
5029 AMST-264-01 Representations of Autism(s) 1.00 LEC Paulin,Diana R. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with ENGL
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  With increased visibility and diagnosis rates (1 in 50), autism spectrum disorders constitute a vital part of our nation’s fabric. Because it crosses boundaries, regardless of ethnicity, race, or socioeconomic status and because of its pervasiveness, a critical study of autism representations provides an instructive site for exploring overlapping commonalities and differences in U.S. culture. We will consider how shifting definitions of disability/ability contribute to our understanding of central values/beliefs, such as normalcy, success, humanity, and progress. How do representations and lived experiences frame our society’s understanding of identity, community, citizenship, agency, equality and humanity? Texts include fiction, memoir, film, poetry, print news, periodicals, legal documents, theoretical articles, television, internet media. Some titles include, Rainman and Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime.
4568 AMST-301-01 Jr. Sem.: American Texts 1.00 SEM Heatherton,Christina W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in American Studies 203 or AMST 210 or concurrent enrollment.
  This course, required for the American studies major and ordinarily taken in the fall of the junior year, examines central texts in American history and culture. Through intensive discussion and writing, the class will explore the contexts of these works as well as the works themselves, paying particular attention to the interrelated issues of race, class, gender, and other similarly pivotal social constructs. Course is open only to American studies majors.
4968 AMST-311-01 Data Driven Cultures 1.00 LEC Gieseking,Jack MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  From the algorithms that time traffic lights to those that filter search criteria and record thoughts and ideas, human existence is increasingly defined by code. This course explores the possibilities, limitations, and implications of using digital tools and methods to understand the issues that affect our everyday lives. What does data reveal to us about the world? What does it hide? Which data-based policy interventions should be made on behalf of the common good? To answer these questions students will learn to apply a critical lens for understanding and evaluating what technology can and cannot bring to the study of American life.
4855 AMST-332-01 Credit and Crisis 1.00 SEM Heatherton,Christina TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  This course explores the concepts of credit and crisis amid the global expansion of U.S. capitalism. From intimate struggles with indebtedness to grand projects of nation building, we will interrogate how discourses of debt have informed our commonplace social categories across scales. Readings will trace the historical and geographical transformation of the U.S., from its role as a debtor to its emergence as a creditor nation. It will consider how the vexed notion of American “inheritance” has related to the expansion of credit and deepening of economic crises. Through film, literature, and scholarly analysis it will trace how economic crisis and the concept of “failure” can be seen through the lens of personal identities; separating those who could assume risk from those deemed "at risk."
5022 AMST-333-01 Women of Color in the US 1.00 SEM Manevitz,Alexander D. MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with HIST
  Focusing primarily on African American, Native American, Latin American, and Asian American women, this course will examine the cultural, economic, and political histories of women of color in the United States. Major themes will include immigration, labor, family, education, social movements, and civil rights.
4273 AMST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
4054 AMST-402-01 Senior Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: Requires completion of the Special Registration Form, available in the Office of the Registrar.
  Students undertake projects on American studies topics of their own choosing. The projects will be supervised by a faculty member in an American studies-related field. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the project adviser and director, are required for enrollment.
4637 AMST-409-01 Race, Gender, Global Security 1.00 SEM Manevitz,Alexander D. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with GLBLSTD
  Recent events have focused attention on questions of race, gender, social justice, and the militarization of police. This course will consider how notions of race and security that evolved in the late 20th and early 21st century U.S., have shaped political discourse, and how in turn, those ideas have circulated around the world. Through analyses of American Studies texts, documentaries, and popular culture, we will consider both emerging and prevailing definitions of security. By examining case studies in major global cities, including Los Angeles, we will explore how space has been organized around the logics of racialized threats and gendered notions of safety. For a cumulative paper, students will select a global city and offer history, context, and analysis of the production of insecure spaces.
4638 AMST-409-02 SrSem: Spectacle of Disability 1.00 SEM Paulin,Diana R. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 14 Waitlist available: N
  This course examines how people with disabilities are represented in American literature and culture. Whether it is the exceptional savant who is heralded as a hero because of her "special" abilities or the critically injured person whose disability relegates him to the sidelines of society even though his ability to overcome everyday challenges is applauded from a distance, definitions of disabilities (both generally and explicitly) tell us a great deal about the concept of normalcy and the expectations that we attach to this term. In addition, the various narratives associated with different disabilities and their origins are shaped by other aspects of identity, such as socio-economic class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, and gender. We will look at a variety of mediums including fiction, non-fiction, film, television, and memoirs in order to examine how these representations, along with the material realities of disabled people, frame our society's understanding of disability and the consequences of these formulations. We look at texts and cases such as Million Dollar Baby, the Terry Schiavo case, Born on a Blue Day, Forrest Gump, the American Disabilities Act, the Christopher Reeves story, and Radio.
5017 AMST-409-03 Queer America 1.00 SEM Gieseking,Jack T: 1:30PM-4:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with WMGS
  Drawing on interdisciplinary work in lgbtq studies, Queer America uses key spaces and scales as lenses and sites in this research seminar. From bars and community centers, neighborhoods and cruising grounds, to cities and rural Walmarts, websites and social media, students will employ queer theory to broaden their understandings of lgbtq spaces in the nation. The application of classic and cutting-edge work in geographies of lgbtq culture will challenge the seemingly normal histories and geographies of American life.
4614 AMST-425-01 Museums,Vis Cult&Crit Theory 1.00 SEM Miller,Karen Li W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-825-01
  This course aims to examine the issues brought up in key theoretical readings by applying their insights to case studies, particularly cases of museum exhibitions and programs. Issues to be addressed include: reproduction and spectacle; gender and display; ethnicity, 'primitivism,' and race; and sexuality, sexual practice, and censorship. Case studies will vary each year and will range from exhibitions focusing on consumption, to ethnicity and race (such as the Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Pequot Museum), and sexuality (The Museum of Sex; the Robert Mapplethorpe exhibitions). Each class will combine theoretical readings with considerations of museum practice. By the end of the semester, students shall be able to analyze exhibitions using both the tools of postmodern theory and practical observation and history.
4274 AMST-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
4622 AMST-468-01 Amer Labor & Cultural Politics 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
  This course will address the importance of the American labor movement in producing, contesting, and amplifying meaning within larger contexts of class, knowledge, and power. Although many such meanings arise within the expected domains of work, pay, and workers, and serve as crucial resources for communities and unions, they also are closely related to projects of achieving justice for larger imagined communities (e.g., “the people”). Readings will provide a broad overview of labor movements since the Civil War as well as close study of selected cultural work, such as challenging class subordination, shaping and contesting racialization, engendering and valorizing work, interrogating the wage relation, pursuing contradictory visions of authority and modernization, and seeking reform within today’s increasingly hostile political climates and structures.
4275 AMST-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
4228 AMST-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director, are required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
4598 AMST-802-01 Primary Research Matls 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This seminar is designed to enable students to identify, evaluate, and use a range of primary sources, from personal letters, vital records, and the census to photographs, oral history, and newspapers. Students will critically read secondary literature to explore how other scholars have used primary sources, and will develop research projects on topics of their own choosing, based on primary sources available in local archives and repositories. Course not open to undergraduates.
4613 AMST-825-01 Museums,Vis Cult&Crit Theory 1.00 SEM Miller,Karen Li W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-425-01
  This course aims to examine the issues brought up in key theoretical readings by applying their insights to case studies, particularly cases of museum exhibitions and programs. Issues to be addressed include: reproduction and spectacle; gender and display; ethnicity, 'primitivism,' and race; and sexuality, sexual practice, and censorship. Case studies will vary each year and will range from exhibitions focusing on consumption, to ethnicity and race (such as the Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Pequot Museum), and sexuality (The Museum of Sex; the Robert Mapplethorpe exhibitions). Each class will combine theoretical readings with considerations of museum practice. By the end of the semester, students shall be able to analyze exhibitions using both the tools of postmodern theory and practical observation and history.
4401 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
4402 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4245 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
4246 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
4252 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
4368 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
4806 AHIS-271-01 The Arts of America 1.00 LEC Curran,Kathleen A. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 40 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  This course examines major trends in painting, sculpture, architecture, and the decorative arts in the United States from the colonial period to 1900. Emphasis will be placed on how the arts in the United States reflect the social and cultural history of the 18th and 19th centuries.
4392 EDUC-300-01 Education Reform: Past&Present 1.00 LEC Dougherty,John A. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, PBPL
  Prerequisite: C- or better in EDUC200, or American Studies major or Public Policy and Law major.
  How do we explain the rise and decline of education reform movements? How do we evaluate their level of “success” from different sources of evidence? Drawing upon primary source materials and historical interpretations, this course examines a broad array of elementary, secondary, and higher education reform movements from the mid-19th century to the present, analyzing social, material, and ideological contexts. This intermediate-level seminar explores a topic common to all branches of educational studies from both theoretical and comparative perspectives.
4953 ENGL-105-01 Intro to Amer Lit II 1.00 LEC Mrozowski,Daniel J. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  This course surveys major works of American literature after 1865, from literary reckonings with the Civil War and its tragic residues, to works of "realism" and "naturalism" that contended with the late 19th century’s rapid pace of social change, to the innovative works of the modern and postmodern eras. As we read works by authors such as Mark Twain, Kate Chopin, William Faulkner, and Toni Morrison, we will inquire: how have literary texts defined and redefined "America" and Americans? What are the means by which some groups have been excluded from the American community, and what are their experiences of that exclusion? And how do these texts shape our understanding of the unresolved problems of post-Civil War American democracy? For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
4966 ENGL-208-01 From Epic to X-Box:Narr Histry 1.00 LEC Henton,Alice M.H. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
  This course looks at the way narrative techniques have changed over time and across various media: it begins with Old English Epics and concludes with digital games. How, we will ask, has the experience of narratives and fictional characters varied across time and forms? In what ways has it stayed constant? How have we gotten from stories about Beowulf to games featuring Master Chief, or the Hero of Ferelden? How, precisely, do we interact with stories and storytelling? How do these interactions change, or not change, when narrative becomes interactive, something one can "play" as opposed to "watch" or "hear" or "read?" To think about these questions, we will examine a variety of narratives and explore a number of narrative theories. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
4954 ENGL-265-01 Intro to Film Studies 1.00 LEC Younger,James Prakash TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM
T: 6:30PM-9:10PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 49 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, FILM
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. It is also the gateway course for the literature and film concentration.
  NOTE: Evening meetings of this class are for film screening only.
  This course provides a general introduction to the study of film and focuses on the key terms and concepts used to describe and analyze the film experience. As we put this set of tools and methods in place, we will also explore different modes of film production (fictional narrative, documentary, experimental) and some of the critical issues and debates that have shaped the discipline of film studies (genre, auteurism, film aesthetics, ideology). Note: Evening meetings of this class are for film screenings only. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective. It is also the gateway course for the literature and film concentration. This course can be counted toward fulfillment of requirements for the film studies minor.
5034 ENGL-329-01 Civil War Literature 1.00 SEM Hager,Christopher TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written from 1700-1900, and a course emphasizing critical reflection. This course is research intensive.
  In this course, we will learn about the literary culture of the Civil War era (by reading Louisa May Alcott, Rebecca Harding Davis, Herman Melville, and Walt Whitman, among others) and also consider broader questions about how we read, value, and remember literary works. What makes a text "Civil War literature"? Must it have been written during the U.S. Civil War, or about events of that war, or by a person who participated in the war? And do we understand literature differently when we organize it around a historical event rather than forms, genres, or authors? We will engage with the most recent scholarship on the subject and converse (in person or via Skype) with some of the nation's leading experts on Civil War literature.
4960 ENGL-439-16 The Documentary 1.00 SEM Riggio,Milla C. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, FILM Cross-listing: ENGL-839-12
  NOTE: English 439-16 and English 839-12 are the same course. Enrollment limit is 15: 7 undergraduates/8 graduates. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement, or a core course for the literature and film concentration. This course is research-intensive.
  Documentary films chronicle varied cultural, social, and political realities, from coal miners’ strikes and social revolutions to the development of musical genres. Documentary styles range from fictionalized recreations (docudramas) to narrative reenactments to non-narrative commentaries. This course will examine key documentary strategies through representative films, which may include Harlan County USA (Barbara Kopple, 1976) and Shut Up and Sing (Kopple and Cecilia Peck, 2006), Journalist and the Jihadi: The Murder of Daniel Pearl (Ahmad Jamal and Ramesh Sharma, 2006): segments of The Battle of Algiers, Poto Mitan: Haitian Women, Pillars of the Global Economy (Renee Bergan and Mark Schuller), Jazz (selected episodes) (Ken Burns, 2001), Say Amen, Somebody (George Nierenberg, 1982), An Inconvenient Truth (Davis Guggenheim, 2008), and Fair Game (Doug Liman, 2010). Note: English 439-16 and English 839-12 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement, or a core course for the literature and film concentration.
5168 ENGL-451-01 Queer Harlem Renaissance 1.00 SEM Paulin,Diana R. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, WMGS
  This course approaches the Harlem Renaissance or "the New Negro" Movement through the lens of sexuality, paying particular attention to the ways in which understandings of racial identity were filtered through representations of sex and gender. We will consider how writers of the Harlem Renaissance explored notions of sexuality and gender given the history of slavery and exploitation that generated rigid formulations of race and gender. How did cultural producers challenge, reinforce, question and imagine sexuality and its intersection with other aspects of identity, such as class, gender, and national origins. Writers/artists include, Wallace Thurman, Carl Van Vechten, Bessie Smith, Angelina Weld Grimke, Claude McKay, Countee Cullen, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Langston Hughes, and Bruce Nugent.
5160 ENGL-839-12 The Documentary 1.00 SEM Riggio,Milla C. W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, FILM Cross-listing: ENGL-439-16
  NOTE: English439-16 and English 839012 are the same course.
  NOTE: For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement , or a core course for the literature and film concentration.
  NOTE: This is a research intensive course.
  Documentary films chronicle varied cultural, social, and political realities, from coal miners’ strikes and social revolutions to the development of musical genres. Documentary styles range from fictionalized recreations (docudramas) to narrative reenactments to non-narrative commentaries. This course will examine key documentary strategies through representative films, which may include Harlan County USA (Barbara Kopple, 1976) and Shut Up and Sing (Kopple and Cecilia Peck, 2006), Journalist and the Jihadi: The Murder of Daniel Pearl (Ahmad Jamal and Ramesh Sharma, 2006): segments of The Battle of Algiers, Poto Mitan: Haitian Women, Pillars of the Global Economy (Renee Bergan and Mark Schuller), Jazz (selected episodes) (Ken Burns, 2001), Say Amen, Somebody (George Nierenberg, 1982), An Inconvenient Truth (Davis Guggenheim, 2008), and Fair Game (Doug Liman, 2010). Note: English 439-16 and English 839-12 are the same course. For undergraduate English majors, this course satisfies a post-1900 distribution requirement, or a core course for the literature and film concentration.
4199 HISP-280-01 Hispanic Hartford 1.00 LEC Aponte-Aviles,Aidali M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 19 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, CLIC, EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221 or 224, or permission of instructor.
  This course seeks to place Trinity students in active and informed dialogue with the Hartford region’s large and diverse set of Spanish-speaking communities. The course will help student recognize and analyze the distinct national histories (e.g. Peruvian, Puerto Rican, Chilean, Honduran, Cuban, Colombian, and Mexican) which have contributed to the Hispanic diaspora in the city and the entire northeastern region of the United States. Students will undertake field projects designed to look at the effects of transnational migration on urban culture, institution-building, and identity formation. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
4983 HIST-208-01 North Amer Environmental Hist 1.00 LEC Wickman,Thomas M. MWF: 10:00AM-10:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  This course surveys the environmental history of North America and the Caribbean from 1491 to the present. Topics include indigenous practice, colonization, agricultural intensification, industrialization, urbanization, war, waste disposal, and climate change. Above all, the course will be concerned with the political conflicts and social inequities that arose as the continent and its surrounding waters underwent centuries of ecological change. The global environmental contexts and consequences of American political and economic activities also will be emphasized.
5140 HIST-247-01 Latinos/Latinas in USA 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, LATINAMER, WMGS
  Who are “Latinos/Latinas” and how have they come to constitute a central ethnic/racial category in the contemporary United States? This is the organizing question around which this course examines the experiences of major Latino/Latina groups—Chicanos/Mexicanos, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans—and new immigrants from Central America and the Caribbean. We study U.S. colonialism and imperialism in the Old Mexican North and the Caribbean; migration and immigration patterns and policies; racial, gender, and class distinctions; cultural and political expressions and conflicts; return migrations and transnationalism; and inter-ethnic relations and the construction of pan-Latino/Latina diasporic identities.
4628 HIST-344-01 America's Most Wanted 1.00 SEM Greenberg,Cheryl TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  Americans are fascinated by crime. We read detective fiction, watch police dramas, and hold murder mystery dinners. When the crimes are real, we debate guilt or innocence, punishment or rehabilitation, death penalty or life in prison at our dinner tables. Why this fascination, and what does it tell us about our culture and our concerns? In this course we examine several actual crimes and try to understand what made these crimes, and not others, so riveting. What drew us in? What kept us there? Along the way we will also discuss changing police and penal practices, how attitudes about race, class, religion, and gender play into public fixations on particular crimes, and how and why those attitudes shifted over time.
5045 INTS-234-01 Gender and Education 1.00 LEC Bauer,Janet L. TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, ANTH, EDUC, GLBLSTD, WMGS
  What is gender equity in schooling and what impact does this have on gender equity more broadly? Different disciplinary perspectives on the impact of gender in learning, school experience, performance and achievement will be explored in elementary, secondary, post-secondary, and informal educational settings. The legal and public policy implications of these findings (such as gender-segregated schooling, men’s and women’s studies programs, curriculum reform, Title IX, affirmative action and other proposed remedies) will be explored. Findings on socialization and schooling in the U.S. will be contrasted with those from other cultures.
5048 INTS-249-01 Immigrants & Refugees 1.00 SEM Bauer,Janet L. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 30 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, ANTH, GLBLSTD, PBPL, WMGS
  The post-cold war world is one of changing national boundaries and governments, environmental devastation and internal conflicts, resulting in an apparently unprecedented flow of people from their native homelands. At a time when multiculturalism is not a popular model for national integration, immigrants, refugees, and other sojourners find themselves in new places creating new lives for themselves. The processes by which this occurs illustrate some of the basic social, cultural, and political dilemmas of contemporary societies. Using historical and contemporary case studies from Europe and the Americas, this course looks at issues of flight, resettlement, integration, cultural adaptation, and public policy involved in creating culturally diverse nations. Questions to be raised include what are the conditions under which people leave, who can become a (authentic) member of society, what rights do non-citizens versus citizens have, are borders sacrosanct, are ethnic and racial diversity achievable or desirable, is multiculturalism an appropriate model, do people want to assimilate, what are the cultural consequences of movement, and how can individuals reconstruct their identities and feel they belong? This course includes a community learning component. (Also offered under American Studies, Public Policy & Law, and Women, Gender, & Sexuality.)
5054 MUSC-274-01 Jazz: 1900-Present 1.00 LEC Allen,Jennifer M. TBA TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 40 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  Through listening, discussion, and reading, this course will survey the development of jazz from ragtime and pre-jazz through New Orleans swing, be-bop, and modern jazz. Among composers and performers to be studied include Louis Armstrong, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Scott Joplin, Thelonious Monk, Charles Parker, and Woody Shaw. No previous training in music is required. Also listed under American Studies.
4700 POLS-102-01 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Laws,Serena MW: 1:15PM-2:30PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats are reserved for first year students.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
5151 RELG-267-01 Religion and the Media 1.00 LEC Silk,Mark R. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, PBPL
  Western religion, and Christianity in particular, has always put a premium on employing the available techniques of mass communication to get its message out. But today, many religious people see the omnipresent “secular” media as hostile to their faith. This course will look at the relationship between religion and the communications media, focusing primarily on how the American news media have dealt with religion since the creation of the penny press in the 1830s. Attention will also be given to the ways that American religious institutions have used mass media to present themselves, from the circulation of Bibles and tracts in the 19th century through religious broadcasting beginning in the 20th century to the use of the Internet today. (May be counted toward American studies and public policy studies.)
4432 SOCL-241-01 Mass Media & Pop Culture 1.00 LEC Williams,Johnny Eric TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 40 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, GLBLSTDS
  Prerequisite: C- or better in a prior Sociology course or permission of instructor.
  This course examines the integral role mass communication has in social and cultural life. Specifically, it explores how we identify and construct our social identity using media images. This is accomplished by focusing on different types of media content and their effect on individuals and culture, as well as by examining audience response to media content. Other topics covered include the social and economic organization of mass media, development of communication technologies, and sexist and racist stereotypes in the media.
4618 THDN-247-01 Post War American Theater 1.00 SEM Power,Katharine G. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, PBPL
  This course offers a survey of prominent plays and choreographies authored by American theater artists during the post-war period (1945-1965). Playwrights such as Arthur Miller, Lorraine Hansberry, and Tennessee Williams, along with selected choreographers, including Martha Graham and Alvin Ailey will be discussed with reference to the House Committee on Unamerican Activities; the popularity of Freudian and Jungian psychoanalysis; the emergence of a civil rights movement; and the social and political forces of "containment" that defined the early years of the Cold War era.
4800 WMGS-345-01 Film Noir 1.00 SEM Corber,Robert J. T: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST, ENGL, FILM
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 300-level elective.
  This course traces the development of film noir, a distinctive style of Hollywood filmmaking inspired by the hardboiled detective fiction of Dashiell Hammett, James Cain, and Raymond Chandler. It pays particular attention to the genre’s complicated gender and sexual politics. In addition to classic examples of film noir, the course also considers novels by Hammett, Cain, and Chandler.
4413 WMGS-369-01 Queer Studies:Issues & Controv 1.00 LEC Corber,Robert J. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also cross-referenced with AMST
  This broadly interdisciplinary course examines the impact of queer theory on the study of gender and sexuality in both the humanities and the social sciences. In positing that there is no necessary or causal relationship between sex, gender, and sexuality, queer theory has raised important questions about the identity-based understandings of gender and sexuality still dominant in the social sciences. This course focuses on the issues queer theory has raised in the social sciences as its influence has spread beyond the humanities. Topics covered include: queer theory’s critique of identity; institutional versus discursive forms of power in the regulation of gender and sexuality; the value of psychoanalysis for the study of sexuality; and lesbian and gay historiography versus queer historiography.