COURSE SCHEDULE

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Course Listing for AMERICAN STUDIES - Spring 2015
Class
No.
Course ID Title Credits Type Instructor(s) Days:Times Location Permission
Required
Dist Qtr
1006 AMST-203-01 Conflcts & Cultures Am Society 1.00 LEC Wickman,Thomas M. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: Seats will be reserved as follows: 10 - first-year, 10 - sophomore.
  Focusing on a key decade in American life—the 1890s, for example, or the 1850s—this course will examine the dynamics of race, class, gender, and ethnicity as forces that have shaped, and been shaped by, American culture. How did various groups define themselves at particular historical moments? How did they interact with each other and with American society? Why did some groups achieve hegemony and not others, and what were—and are—the implications of these dynamics for our understanding of American culture? By examining both interpretive and primary documents—novels, autobiographies, works of art, and popular culture—we will consider these and other questions concerning the production of American culture.
1518 AMST-210-01 Doing Culture 1.00 LEC Baldwin,Davarian L. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Culture is not something we simply consume, inhabit or even create. Culture is serious business: pun both intended and upended. We have a dynamic relationship with the world around us and in this class we will use culture, both elite and popular, to help bridge the gap between what we do here in the “ivory tower” and how we live out there in the “real world,” hopefully changing both in the process. Here we will not take culture for granted but engage culture as a method, a tool by which to engage, analyze and critique both historical narratives and contemporary events. In this course, street life, advertisements, popular media, and clothing are interrogated as archives of dynamic meaning, arenas of social interaction, acts of personal pleasure, and sites of struggle. We will also explore what happens when a diversity of forces converge at the intersection of commerce and culture. Present day notions of popular culture, and topics such as authenticity and selling out, will be interrogated both socially and historically.
1909 AMST-254-01 Invisible Man & Black Mod Expr 1.00 LEC Baldwin,Davarian L. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  This class interrogates the text and contexts of Ralph Ellison’s iconic novel Invisible Man. Specifically, bringing historical and cultural analysis to bear on a single work of fiction, this course surveys key themes in the Black modern experience from 1899 to 1950 including migration, urbanization, the black modern aesthetic, black radicalism, and black nationalism. Ultimately, Ellison crafted a text of profound social commentary through experimentation with archival evidence and literary form. This class reconstructs the intellectual, aesthetic, and historical production of an American classic.
2153 AMST-263-01 American Civil Rights Movement 1.00 LEC Greenberg,Cheryl TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under HRST, MNOR Cross-listing: HIST-260-01
  African Americans and their allies have long struggled to win equal rights and equal opportunities in America. We will examine the course of that struggle in the twentieth century, focusing primarily on the period 1950-1968. We will consider questions of urbanization, employment, racism, politics, violence, non-violence, Black Power and the notion of “race blindness.” The end of the course will be spent considering the present day. What has been resolved, and what issues remain? Are there new challenges to achieving racial equality in the U.S? Have we become “post-racial” yet, and do we want to be?
1519 AMST-284-01 Food and American Culture 1.00 LEC Miller,Karen Li MW: 10:00AM-11:15AM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  What we eat and how we eat reflect more than basic physical needs, and food has long played influential roles in defining and representing American culture, identities, and nationalism. Our course will begin by examining the history of the Thanksgiving feast and conclude with contemporary movements in organic and farm-to-table eating. As we explore foods' implications for Americanism, gender, class, and age, our topics of study will include defining edibles and non-edibles, immigrant influences, food and technology, American farming, diet fads, school lunches and gardens, hunger in America and food regulations. Our class will work with the nearby Billings Forge community to learn more about food's roles in family life and social reforms, including urban renewal.
1910 AMST-301-01 Jr. Sem.: American Texts 1.00 SEM Gac,Scott W: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA WEB  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Prerequisite: C- or better in American Studies 203 or AMST 210 or concurrent enrollment.
  This course, required for the American studies major and ordinarily taken in the fall of the junior year, examines central texts in American history and culture. Through intensive discussion and writing, the class will explore the contexts of these works as well as the works themselves, paying particular attention to the interrelated issues of race, class, gender, and other similarly pivotal social constructs. Course is open only to American studies majors.
2195 AMST-340-01 Body in 19th C Am Culture 1.00 SEM Miller,Karen Li M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under ENGL, WMGS
  We will explore representations of the body in relation to American identities, including controlling ethnic bodies through slavery and exotic exhibits, as well as defining gender ideals by conflating the female body with corsets and hysteria and the male with the "strong man" aesthetic. Although anxious about ill bodies in the tenements and disfigured ones in factories, Americans were also fascinated by the extremes of the human body as indicated by the popularity of sideshows, magicians, and miracle cures. Our materials will include literary texts, art studies, and popular media. We will discuss such writers and artists as Louisa May Alcott, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Mark Twain, Catherine Beecher, William Sydney Mount, John Gadsby Chapman, and Lily Martin Spencer.
1591 AMST-387-01 Assessing Adoption 1.00 LEC Heatherton,Christina M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  This course examines the social and cultural meanings of adoption. How has modern adoption changed ideas of family? Which parents are able to adopt and which children are eligible to be adopted? Beginning with U.S. adoption's historical roots, this course focuses on different forms of adoption, including domestic, international, private, and public adoption, as well as transracial and gay adoption. From orphan trains to foster care and from infertility to teen pregnancies, this course reviews factors that encourage and prevent adoption. We will consider the ways laws and ethics have shaped adoption's move from secrecy and closed adoptions to forthrightness and open adoptions/records practices. Reading memoirs, screening films, and reviewing data, we will discuss the roles of members of the adoption triad: birth parents, adoptive parents, and adoptees, while learning about the impact of adoption on identity development.
1266 AMST-399-01 Independent Study 1.00 - 2.00 IND Staff,Trinity TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
1007 AMST-402-01 Senior Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N
  NOTE: Requires completion of the Special Registration Form, available in the Office of the Registrar.
  Students undertake projects on American studies topics of their own choosing. The projects will be supervised by a faculty member in an American studies-related field. Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the project adviser and director, are required for enrollment.
1562 AMST-409-01 Class and American Culture 1.00 SEM Heatherton,Christina TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Class inequality is nothing new in the United States. While some have referred to America as a “classless” society, class and its representations are omnipresent in U.S. history, culture, and identity. This course will use written and visual primary-source texts to uncover the ideologies, representations, and narratives of class in American culture over the past two centuries. It will also look at how class has intersected with ideologies of race, gender, nationality, and identity. In bringing class out into the open, students will gain a better understanding of U.S. history and culture as well as our current conjuncture.
2123 AMST-423-01 The History of American Sports 1.00 SEM Goldstein,Warren T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under HIST Cross-listing: AMST-823-01
  This course will examine American sports from their beginnings in Puritan-era games to the multi-billion-dollar industries of today. We will begin by looking at the relationship between work, play, and religion in the colonies. We will trace the beginnings of horseracing, baseball, and boxing, and their connections to saloons, gambling, and the bachelor subculture of the Victorian underworld. We will study the rise of respectable sports in the mid- and late 19th century; follow baseball as it became the national pastime; see how college football took over higher education; and account for the rise of basketball. We will look at sports and war, sports and moral uplift, and sports and the culture of consumption. Finally, we will examine the rise of mass leisure, the impact of radio and television, racial segregation and integration, the rise of women’s sports, battles between players and owners in the last 25 years, and the entrance of truly big money into professional sports. Readings in primary and secondary sources will emphasize the historical experience of sports in the United States so that students can develop a framework for understanding current events, including the NHL lockout, the Kobe Bryant affair, and the controversies over steroids.
2088 AMST-425-01 Museums,Vis Cult&Crit Theory 1.00 SEM McCombie,Mary E. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-825-01
  This course aims to examine the issues brought up in key theoretical readings by applying their insights to case studies, particularly cases of museum exhibitions and programs. Issues to be addressed include: reproduction and spectacle; gender and display; ethnicity, 'primitivism,' and race; and sexuality, sexual practice, and censorship. Case studies will vary each year and will range from exhibitions focusing on consumption, to ethnicity and race (such as the Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Pequot Museum), and sexuality (The Museum of Sex; the Robert Mapplethorpe exhibitions). Each class will combine theoretical readings with considerations of museum practice. By the end of the semester, students shall be able to analyze exhibitions using both the tools of postmodern theory and practical observation and history.
1267 AMST-466-01 Teaching Assistantship 0.50 - 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar’s Office, and the approval of the instructor are required for enrollment.
2129 AMST-468-01 Amer Labor & Cultural Politics 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-868-01
  This course will address the importance of the American labor movement in producing, contesting, and amplifying meaning within larger contexts of class, knowledge, and power. Although many such meanings arise within the expected domains of work, pay, and workers, and serve as crucial resources for communities and unions, they also are closely related to projects of achieving justice for larger imagined communities (e.g., “the people”). Readings will provide a broad overview of labor movements since the Civil War as well as close study of selected cultural work, such as challenging class subordination, shaping and contesting racialization, engendering and valorizing work, interrogating the wage relation, pursuing contradictory visions of authority and modernization, and seeking reform within today’s increasingly hostile political climates and structures.
1268 AMST-490-01 Research Assistantship 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N
1215 AMST-499-01 Senior Thesis Part 2 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N
  Submission of the special registration form, available in the Registrar's Office, and the approval of the thesis adviser and the director, are required for each semester of this year-long thesis. (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
2020 AMST-802-01 Primary Research Matls 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  This seminar is designed to enable students to identify, evaluate, and use a range of primary sources, from personal letters, vital records, and the census to photographs, oral history, and newspapers. Students will critically read secondary literature to explore how other scholars have used primary sources, and will develop research projects on topics of their own choosing, based on primary sources available in local archives and repositories. Course not open to undergraduates.
2021 AMST-803-01 Historiography&Historical Rsch 1.00 SEM Walsh,Andrew H. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  New England has had a sense of its boundaries, identity, and larger purposes since the mid-17th century and it began producing historical literature about itself earlier than other regions of what would become the United States. This course has a dual agenda—to study the evolution of historical consciousness in and about New England and to use the region’s rich and varied historical literature to prepare students for their own historical research on the region.
2085 AMST-823-01 The History of American Sports 1.00 SEM Goldstein,Warren T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under HIST Cross-listing: AMST-423-01
  This course will examine American sports from their beginnings in Puritan-era games to the multi-billion-dollar industries of today. We will begin by looking at the relationship between work, play, and religion in the colonies. We will trace the beginnings of horseracing, baseball, and boxing, and their connections to saloons, gambling, and the bachelor subculture of the Victorian underworld. We will study the rise of respectable sports in the mid- and late 19th century; follow baseball as it became the national pastime; see how college football took over higher education; and account for the rise of basketball. We will look at sports and war, sports and moral uplift, and sports and the culture of consumption. Finally, we will examine the rise of mass leisure, the impact of radio and television, racial segregation and integration, the rise of women’s sports, battles between players and owners in the last 25 years, and the entrance of truly big money into professional sports. Readings in primary and secondary sources will emphasize the historical experience of sports in the United States so that students can develop a framework for understanding current events, including the NHL lockout, the Kobe Bryant affair, and the controversies over steroids.
2086 AMST-825-01 Museums,Vis Cult&Crit Theory 1.00 SEM McCombie,Mary E. T: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-425-01
  This course aims to examine the issues brought up in key theoretical readings by applying their insights to case studies, particularly cases of museum exhibitions and programs. Issues to be addressed include: reproduction and spectacle; gender and display; ethnicity, 'primitivism,' and race; and sexuality, sexual practice, and censorship. Case studies will vary each year and will range from exhibitions focusing on consumption, to ethnicity and race (such as the Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Pequot Museum), and sexuality (The Museum of Sex; the Robert Mapplethorpe exhibitions). Each class will combine theoretical readings with considerations of museum practice. By the end of the semester, students shall be able to analyze exhibitions using both the tools of postmodern theory and practical observation and history.
2139 AMST-838-01 America Collects Itself 1.00 SEM Ring,Richard J. R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under HIST
  Collecting American history is as alive and well in America today as it was soon after the republic was constituted. In the late 18th-century Americans became enamored of “writing” the new nation’s history, both in the literal sense of creating narratives, and the figurative sense of collecting the books and documents which would inform and underpin those narratives. The first institution created specifically to collect and preserve American history was the Massachusetts Historical Society, founded in 1791, during George Washington’s presidency. This course will trace the conscious collecting (by both individuals and institutions) of documents and artifacts from the 18th century to the present day relating to "America," as that term was variously defined over time.
2130 AMST-868-01 Amer Labor & Cultural Politics 1.00 SEM Southern,Jacquelyn R: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 8 Waitlist available: N
    Cross-listing: AMST-468-01
  This course will address the importance of the American labor movement in producing, contesting, and amplifying meaning within larger contexts of class, knowledge, and power. Although many such meanings arise within the expected domains of work, pay, and workers, and serve as crucial resources for communities and unions, they also are closely related to projects of achieving justice for larger imagined communities (e.g., “the people”). Readings will provide a broad overview of labor movements since the Civil War as well as close study of selected cultural work, such as challenging class subordination, shaping and contesting racialization, engendering and valorizing work, interrogating the wage relation, pursuing contradictory visions of authority and modernization, and seeking reform within today’s increasingly hostile political climates and structures.
2140 AMST-870-01 Nat Amer Pictorial Narrative 1.00 SEM Couch,N. C. Christopher W: 6:30PM-9:30PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 7 Waitlist available: N
  This seminar examines Native American Indian narrative artistic, pictorial, and literary traditions from North and Central America.Such traditions are inseparable from culture and performance, community and nation, human life and the physical world. The visual and tactile media considered include pictorial manuscripts, ceramics, bead- and shellwork, textiles, photographs, and paintings. The seminar will be interdisciplinary, with each unit including analyses of texts and visual materials and readings on aesthetics, translation, memory, and appropriation.
1473 AMST-894-01 Museums and Communities Intern 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N
  Matriculated American studies students have the opportunity to engage in an academic internship at an area museum or archive for credit toward the American studies degree. Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Studies for more information.
1474 AMST-940-01 Independent Study 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N
  Selected topics in special areas are available by arrangement with the instructor and written approval of the graduate adviser and program director. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1232 AMST-953-01 Research Project 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N
  Under the guidance of a faculty member, graduate students may do an independent research project on a topic in American studies. Written approval of the graduate adviser and the program director are required. Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for the special approval form.
1233 AMST-954-01 Thesis Part I 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N
  (The two course credits are considered pending in Part I of the thesis; they will be awarded with the completion of Part II.)
1239 AMST-955-01 Thesis Part II 1.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N
  (Continuation of American Studies 954.)
1378 AMST-956-01 Thesis 2.00 IND TBA TBA TBA Y  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N
  (Completion of two course credits in one semester).
2037 ECON-214-01 Bus & Entrepreneur Hist 1.00 LEC Gunderson,Gerald A. MW: 8:30AM-9:45AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 40 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Economics 101.
  The evolution of business structures and practices, primarily in the American experience. Changes in such aspects of management, finance, marketing, and information are considered. Special attention is given to the role of entrepreneurs and conditions which may have influenced their creative efforts. Both an analytical approach and case studies are employed.
1412 EDUC-300-01 Education Reform: Past&Present 1.00 LEC Moore,Heather C. M: 6:30PM-9:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 24 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST, PBPL
  Prerequisite: C- or better in EDUC200, or American Studies major or Public Policy and Law major.
  How do we explain the rise and decline of education reform movements? How do we evaluate their level of “success” from different sources of evidence? Drawing upon primary source materials and historical interpretations, this course examines a broad array of elementary, secondary, and higher education reform movements from the mid-19th century to the present, analyzing social, material, and ideological contexts. This intermediate-level seminar explores a topic common to all branches of educational studies from both theoretical and comparative perspectives.
1978 EDUC-307-01 Latinos in Ed: Local Realities 1.00 LEC Dyrness,Andrea W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB5  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST, ANTH, LATINAMER
  Prerequisite: Educational Studies 200 or International Studies, Language and Culture Studies, Hispanic Studies, or Anthropology major, or permission of instructor.
  This course investigates the education of Latinos, the largest and fastest growing minority group in the United States. By examining both the domestic and transnational contexts, we explore these central questions: How do cultural constructions of Latinos (as immigrants and natives, citizens and non-citizens) shape educational policy and teaching practices? What views of citizenship and identity underlie school programs such as bilingual education, as well as Latino responses to them? This course fulfills the related field requirement for Hispanic studies majors. It will also include a community learning component involving a qualitative research project in a Hartford school or community organization.
1053 ENGL-104-01 Intro Amer Literature-I 1.00 LEC Hager,Christopher TR: 8:00AM-9:15AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 50 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  A survey of literature, written and oral, produced in what is now the United States from the earliest times to around the Civil War. We will examine relationships among cultural and intellectual developments and the politics, economics, and societies of North America. Authors to be read include some that are well known—such as Emerson, Melville, Dickinson—and some who are less familiar—such as Cabeza de Vaca, John Rollin Ridge, and Harriet Jacobs. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
1979 ENGL-117-01 Intro African Amer Lit Part II 1.00 LEC Paulin,Diana R. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
  This course surveys African American literature in multiple genres from the 20th-century to the present. We will examine texts by both canonical and emergent writers, such as James Weldon Johnson, Angelina Weld Grimke, Jean Toomer, Nella Larsen, Langston Hughes, Zora Hurston, Ralph Ellison, Ann Petry, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, Octavia Butler, Rita Dove, August Wilson, Alice Walker, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, and others. Our discussions/strategies for reading will be informed by relevant social, historical, and political contexts. In addition to discussing issues of race, nation formation, diasporic identities, class, gender, and sexuality, we will identify/trace recurring ideas/themes, as well as develop a theoretical language to facilitate thoughtful engagement with these works. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a survey.
2089 ENGL-233-01 Evolution of the Western Film 1.00 LEC Younger,James Prakash MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM
M: 6:30PM-9:30PM
TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST, FILM
  NOTE: For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-levle elective.
  The course examines how the Western genre emerged from global popular culture at the end of the 19th century to become one of the most powerful and complex forms for expressing the experience of Modernity. After careful consideration of the political and philosophical implications of the Western, we will track the development of the genre as it responds to the ideological contradictions and cultural tensions of 20th-century American history, focusing on broad trends within the mainstream, the contributions of individual directors, and the global dissemination of generic elements. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a 200-level elective.
1986 ENGL-379-01 Melville 1.00 LEC Hager,Christopher TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST
  NOTE: For English mjaors this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written from 1700-1900emphasizing literature written from 1700-1900. This course is also research intensive.
  Though a superstar during his early career, Herman Melville watched his reputation decline as his literary ambitions escalated. One review of his seventh novel bore the headline, "Herman Melville Crazy." Not until the 20th century did even his best-known work, Moby Dick, attract considerable attention, but it now stands at the center of the American literary pantheon. Melville's work merits intensive, semester-long study not only because he is a canonical author of diverse narratives—from maritime adventures to tortured romances to philosophical allegories—but also because his career and legacy themselves constitute a narrative of central concern to literary studies and American culture. Through reading and discussion of several of his major works, we will explore Melville's imagination, discover his work's historical context, and think critically about literary form. For English majors, this course satisfies the requirement of a course emphasizing literature written between 1700-1900. This course is also research-intensive.
1890 FREN-325-01 Amer in Paris/Parisians in Ame 1.00 SEM Kippur,Sara TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 30 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST Cross-listing: LACS-325-01
  Americans visiting Paris today flock to the literary cafés of the Latin Quarter and the Impressionist paintings at the Musée d’Orsay, but how was it that Paris came to represent a cultural mecca for Americans? To what extent do American cities generally—and New York in particular—occupy a similar place in the cultural imaginary of Parisians? This course draws from an eclectic mix of materials—historical and literary texts, transatlantic correspondence, pop culture and comedy, music, films, political treatises, cultural theory—to examine some of the assumptions, prejudices, and cross-cultural influences that characterize Franco-American relations historically and today. Sample reading list includes works by James Baldwin, Simone de Beauvoir, Adam Gopnik, Ernest Hemingway, Henry Miller, David Sedaris, and Alexis de Tocqueville. Coursework and discussions will be in English. Listed as both LACS 325-01 and FREN 325-01.
1177 HISP-280-01 Hispanic Hartford 1.00 LEC Robyn,Ingrid M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB2  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST, CLIC, EDUC
  Prerequisite: C- or better in Hispanic Studies 221 or 224, or permission of instructor.
  This course seeks to place Trinity students in active and informed dialogue with the Hartford region’s large and diverse set of Spanish-speaking communities. The course will help student recognize and analyze the distinct national histories (e.g. Peruvian, Puerto Rican, Chilean, Honduran, Cuban, Colombian, and Mexican) which have contributed to the Hispanic diaspora in the city and the entire northeastern region of the United States. Students will undertake field projects designed to look at the effects of transnational migration on urban culture, institution-building, and identity formation. (Also offered under the Latin American and Caribbean studies concentration of the International Studies Program.)
2126 HIST-208-01 North Amer Environmental Hist 1.00 LEC Wickman,Thomas M. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST, ENVS
  This course surveys the environmental history of North America and the Caribbean from 1491 to the present. Topics include indigenous practice, colonization, agricultural intensification, industrialization, urbanization, war, waste disposal, and climate change. Above all, the course will be concerned with the political conflicts and social inequities that arose as the continent and its surrounding waters underwent centuries of ecological change. The global environmental contexts and consequences of American political and economic activities also will be emphasized.
2183 HIST-233-01 (Re)Connecting the Black Atlan 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity MWF: 11:00AM-11:50AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST
  This course explores slavery, abolition, and freedom in Brazil and the United States from the 16th to the 19th century. Where only 400,000 Africans were transported to North America during this time, more than 4 million were brought to Brazil, the largest Latin American country. From such numbers, in both countries, in the United States somewhat organically through reproduction and in Brazil through importation, emerged the foundation of massive slave societies. Slavery in the U.S. relied on a highly racialized society, one that formally institutionalized a racial code; slavery in Brazil was less formalized, but no less racial. Such differences had important implications for the eradication of slavery in the two countries.
1845 HIST-311-01 Place in the Native Northeast 1.00 SEM Wickman,Thomas M. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST
  The coasts, rivers, fields, and hills of present-day Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia have been home for indigenous families and communities through numerous environmental, political, and economic transformations. Students will learn about the ways that Native Northeasterners, from Pequots to Micmacs, have adapted, recreated, and reaffirmed a deep connectedness to their homelands, from the fifteenth century to the present. Fields trips to local sites and archives and consultations with tribal historians will facilitate original historical research. Primary sources to be assigned include autobiographies, travel narratives, war histories, maps, Native American stories, and dictionaries of indigenous place names, and secondary source readings will cover major themes in Native American studies, with special emphasis on sense of place.
2149 HIST-344-01 America's Most Wanted 1.00 SEM Greenberg,Cheryl TR: 2:55PM-4:10PM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 15 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST
  Americans are fascinated by crime. We read detective fiction, watch police dramas, and hold murder mystery dinners. When the crimes are real, we debate guilt or innocence, punishment or rehabilitation, death penalty or life in prison at our dinner tables. Why this fascination, and what does it tell us about our culture and our concerns? In this course we examine several actual crimes and try to understand what made these crimes, and not others, so riveting. What drew us in? What kept us there? Along the way we will also discuss changing police and penal practices, how attitudes about race, class, religion, and gender play into public fixations on particular crimes, and how and why those attitudes shifted over time.
1889 LACS-325-01 Amer in Paris/Parisians in Ame 1.00 SEM Kippur,Sara TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 30 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST Cross-listing: FREN-325-01
  Americans visiting Paris today flock to the literary cafés of the Latin Quarter and the Impressionist paintings at the Musée d’Orsay, but how was it that Paris came to represent a cultural mecca for Americans? To what extent do American cities generally—and New York in particular—occupy a similar place in the cultural imaginary of Parisians? This course draws from an eclectic mix of materials—historical and literary texts, transatlantic correspondence, pop culture and comedy, music, films, political treatises, cultural theory—to examine some of the assumptions, prejudices, and cross-cultural influences that characterize Franco-American relations historically and today. Sample reading list includes works by James Baldwin, Simone de Beauvoir, Adam Gopnik, Ernest Hemingway, Henry Miller, David Sedaris, and Alexis de Tocqueville. Coursework and discussions will be in English. Listed as both LACS 325-01 and FREN 325-01.
1313 MUSC-218-01 American Popular Music 1.00 LEC Woldu,Gail H. TR: 1:30PM-2:45PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 40 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST
  NOTE: 10 seats reserved for first-year students
  A broad survey of popular music in the United States from the late 19th century to the present. We will explore blackface minstrelsy, the music of Tin Pan Alley, ragtime and big band jazz, early blues and country music, post-war pop singers, the evolution of rock and roll, rhythm and blues and soul, folk music, alternative music, hip-hop, and MTV and the popular mainstream. Themes of music and identity, multi- cultural sources, the business of music, and the influence of technology will be followed throughout the course. No previous background in music is required. Also listed in American Studies.
1972 MUSC-274-01 Jazz: 1900-Present 1.00 LEC Allen,Jennifer M. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 40 Waitlist available: Y
  Also listed under AMST
  NOTE: 10 seats are reserved for first-year students.
  Through listening, discussion, and reading, this course will survey the development of jazz from ragtime and pre-jazz through New Orleans swing, be-bop, and modern jazz. Among composers and performers to be studied include Louis Armstrong, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Scott Joplin, Thelonious Monk, Charles Parker, and Woody Shaw. No previous training in music is required. Also listed under American Studies.
1165 POLS-102-01 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Laws,Serena TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: Y
  Also listed under AMST
  This course is not open to seniors.
  NOTE: 15 seats reserved for first-year students.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
1907 POLS-102-02 American Natl Govt 1.00 LEC Bourbeau,James R. MW: 6:30PM-7:45PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 35 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST
  This course is not open to seniors.
  How do the institutions of American national government shape our politics and policies? This introductory course examines the nation’s founding documents (including the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Federalist Papers), the goals they sought to achieve, and the institutional framework they established (including Congress, the Presidency, and the courts). It then evaluates the extent to which these institutions achieve their intended aims of representing interests and producing public goods, taking into account the role of parties, interests groups, and the media. Throughout the course, we will attend to the relevance of race, class, religion, and gender. We will draw on the example of the 2012 presidential election and other current events to illustrate the functioning of American government and politics.
2200 POLS-216-01 Amer Political Thought 1.00 LEC TBA TBA TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 30 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST
  A study of the development of American political thought: the colonial period; the Revolution; Jeffersonian democracy; the defense of slave society; social Darwinism; the Populist and Progressive reform movements; and current theories of conservatism, liberalism, and the Left.
1938 POLS-373-01 Law, Politics and Society 1.00 LEC McMahon,Kevin J. MW: 2:40PM-3:55PM TBA  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST
  This course examines the role of law in American society and politics. We will approach law as a living museum displaying the central values, choices, purposes, goals, and ideals of our society. Topics covered include: the nature of law; the structure of American law; the legal profession, juries, and morality; crime and punishment; courts, civil action, and social change; and justice and democracy. Throughout, we will be concerned with law and its relation to cultural change and political conflict.
2029 RELG-214-01 Jews in America 1.00 LEC Kiener,Ronald TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: Y
  Also listed under AMST, JWST
  A social and religious history of American Judaism from pre-revolutionary to contemporary times. After examining the era of immigration and “Americanization,” the course will focus on the ethnic, religious, and social structures of American Judaism: the community center, the synagogue, and the federation. (May be counted toward American studies and Jewish studies.)
1211 RELG-262-01 Religion in America 1.00 LEC Kirkpatrick,Frank TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST
  The historical role of religion in shaping American life and thought, with special attention to the influence of religious ideologies on social values and social reform. (May be counted toward American Studies.)
2042 RELG-386-01 Islam in America 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity TBA TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 20 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST, INTS
  This course explores Muslim social and spiritual expression in the United States. We'll look at the teachings of representative groups and their founders, asking how each group presents Islam and why, how they discourse on Muslims in America, how they discourse on America, and how they position themselves as Americans. Topics include religious movements among African-American and immigrant groups, educational, cultural and youth initiatives, Sufism and new-age movements, civil rights groups, progressive Muslims, women's and feminist movements, and Islam in the media. The course requires that students participate in a community learning project to gain first-hand experience with the diverse Muslim community in Hartford.
1528 SOCL-241-01 Mass Media & Pop Culture 1.00 LEC Staff,Trinity TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA SOC  
  Enrollment limited to 40 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST, GLBLSTDS
  Prerequisite: C- or better in a prior Sociology course or permission of instructor.
  This course examines the integral role mass communication has in social and cultural life. Specifically, it explores how we identify and construct our social identity using media images. This is accomplished by focusing on different types of media content and their effect on individuals and culture, as well as by examining audience response to media content. Other topics covered include the social and economic organization of mass media, development of communication technologies, and sexist and racist stereotypes in the media.
2100 THDN-247-01 Post War American Theater 1.00 SEM Power,Katharine G. M: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA ART  
  Enrollment limited to 18 Waitlist available: Y
  Also listed under AMST, PBPL, POLS
  This course offers a survey of prominent plays and choreographies authored by American theater artists during the post-war period (1945-1965). Playwrights such as Arthur Miller, Lorraine Hansberry, and Tennessee Williams, along with selected choreographers, including Martha Graham and Alvin Ailey will be discussed with reference to the House Committee on Unamerican Activities; the popularity of Freudian and Jungian psychoanalysis; the emergence of a civil rights movement; and the social and political forces of "containment" that defined the early years of the Cold War era.
1974 WMGS-215-01 Drink & Disorder in Amer 1.00 LEC Hedrick,Joan D. TR: 9:25AM-10:40AM TBA HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 40 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST, HIST
  Drinking as an institution has reflected the varieties of cultures, interest groups, and ideologies that have swept America. We will examine the tumultuous history of this institution from the origins of the Republic to the present in order to understand what the ‘wets’ and the ‘drys’ can tell us about the nature of community in America. Special attention to the ways in which gender, race, class, and ethnicity shape perceptions of drinking, leisure, and social control. (Also listed under American Studies and History.)
2150 WMGS-301-01 Western Feminist Thought 1.00 LEC Hedrick,Joan D. TR: 10:50AM-12:05PM TBA Y HUM  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST, HIST, PBPL
  Prerequisite: C- or better in one other course in Women Gender and Sexuality.
  An exploration of the main currents in American feminism, with occasional excursions into European thought. The course readings assume (rather than demonstrate) women’s historical subordination to man and put forward various explanations and strategies for change. Readings in J.S. Mill, C. P. Gilman, Emma Goldman, Simone de Beauvoir, Adrienne Rich, bell hooks, Mary Daly, Audre Lorde, and others. This course is not open to First-Year students.
1490 WMGS-369-01 Queer Studies:Issues & Controv 1.00 LEC Corber,Robert J. W: 1:15PM-3:55PM TBA GLB  
  Enrollment limited to 25 Waitlist available: N
  Also listed under AMST
  This broadly interdisciplinary course examines the impact of queer theory on the study of gender and sexuality in both the humanities and the social sciences. In positing that there is no necessary or causal relationship between sex, gender, and sexuality, queer theory has raised important questions about the identity-based understandings of gender and sexuality still dominant in the social sciences. This course focuses on the issues queer theory has raised in the social sciences as its influence has spread beyond the humanities. Topics covered include: queer theory’s critique of identity; institutional versus discursive forms of power in the regulation of gender and sexuality; the value of psychoanalysis for the study of sexuality; and lesbian and gay historiography versus queer historiography.